America’s 10 Most Sugary Cereals Slideshow

We camped out in the cereal aisle and found the ones most loaded with sugar

10) Kellogg’s Froot Loops

flickr/ Roadside Pictures

41 percent sugar (14.5 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.6 packets of sugar

Toucan Sam and his loops of "froot" debuted in 1962 and have been a breakfast and pop culture mainstay ever since. They’re also loaded with sugar, and coated with a layer of it. 

9) Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch’s Crunch Berries

flickr/ cafemama

42 percent sugar (14.8 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.7 packets of sugar


One can only presume in all of his nautical travels that the Cap’n has encountered a number of sights us land-bound mortals will never see, such as an infinite supply of Crunch Berries. Introduced in 1967, this cereal was the first of many permutations of the Cap’n Crunch cartel.

8) Kellogg’s Apple Jacks

flickr/ theimpulsivebuy

43 percent sugar (15 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.8 packets of sugar


After debuting in 1965 as Apple O’s, this "fruit"-based cereal took its current name in 1971. It shares its name with an apple-based liquor, an odd choice for a children’s cereal. 

7) (Tie) Quaker Oats Oh!s

Quaker Oats

44 percent sugar (15.6 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.9 packets of sugar


This cereal replaced the apostrophe with an exclamation point when it debuted in the 1980s, a move that looks fine on the box but doesn’t exactly translate to grocery lists.

7) (Tie) Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch Original

flickr/ litlnemo

44 percent sugar (15.6 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.9 packets of sugar


The Cap’n (formally known as Horatio Magellan Crunch) launched his maiden voyage to our kitchen cabinets in 1963. It’s difficult to navigate the vast ocean of breakfast cereals without seeing the Cap’n’s influence; it has more spin-offs than most other popular brands.

5) Kellogg’s Smorz

flickr/ Runs With Scissors

45 percent sugar (15.7 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 3.9 packets of sugar


This is one of the newer additions to the breakfast cereal lexicon (introduced in 2003) and it's unabashedly sugary: it essentially calls itself a dessert you put milk on and feed your children in the morning. Amen to truth in advertising.


4) Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch’s OOPS! All Berries

flickr/ theimpulsivebuy

47 percent sugar (16.4 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.1 packets of sugar


Introduced in 1997, All Berries finally freed us from the dark ages when one had to actually take the time to pour a bowl of Crunch Berries and remove all those unwanted, non-berry pieces. Say what you will about his nutritional knowledge; the Cap’n sure knows how to get inside kids’ heads.

3) Kellogg’s Froot Loops Marshmallow

flickr/ dasmart

48 percent sugar (16.9 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.2 packets of sugar


It seems one of  the go-to moves in the cereal industry is to take your existing product and add marshmallows to it. Marshmallows are to prepackaged cereals as bacon is to everything else.


2) Post Golden Crisp

thejrexperiment.com

52 percent sugar (18.1 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.5 packets of sugar


This cereal hit the market as Sugar Crisp in 1949 and has since changed its name (but not its sugar content). However, the mascot still goes by the name Sugar Bear.

1) Kellogg’s Honey Smacks

flickr/ theimpulsivebuy

55 percent sugar (19.4 grams of sugar per 35-gram serving)
Equivalent of 4.9 packets of sugar


Here’s the kingpin of granulated goodness. This product was introduced in 1953 under the name Sugar Smacks, then it was renamed Honey Smacks, then just Smacks and now, it’s back to Honey Smacks. You could probably call them almost anything; kids "dig 'em" for the taste, not the name. With the equivalent of nearly five packets of sugar and two Krispy Kreme glazed donuts per 35-ounce serving, it's the most sugary cereal currently on the market.