Famous Drinks and the Cities They’re Named After

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Learn a city’s vibe one sip at a time

As much as we would love to honestly report that this cocktail hails from Moscow (or at least Russia), we can’t. It was created in New York in 1941, and its name refers to the vodka in the drink, a well-known Russian staple. Traditionally served in a copper mug, the drink is made with vodka, lime juice, and ginger beer.

Famous Drinks and the Cities They’re Named After

No matter where you are, namesake drinks are a reason to celebrate; and who knows, they might just put you in a New York, Singapore, or Chicago of mind. Here’s a list of city-named drinks that live up to their titles’ reputations. 

Chicago Fizz

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There are many that say that the Chicago Fizz was a Chi-town invention and was considered a “Chicago import” at New York’s Waldorf Astoria pre-prohibition, but others say it was invited at the Waldorf itself. Sip and debate away, but wherever it was invented, you’re sure to love this cocktail, whose creaminess is a perfect antidote to cold, windy winter days.

Bronx Cocktail

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According to the 1931 book Old Waldorf Days, the Bronx Cocktail was created around 1900 by a teetotaling bartender named Johnnie Solon who worked at the Men’s Bar at the Waldorf-Astoria in, yes, Manhattan. You can still order this refreshing citrusy martini at the historic, mahogany-paneled Bull and Bear Bar.

Charleston Cocktail

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This cocktail incorporates both of the iconic beverages that are synonymous with the South: lemonade and iced tea. That combo when paired with unique libations, Madeira and muscadine wine-flavored vodka, speaks to the city’s timeless laid-back elegance and charm.

The Moscow Mule

As much as we would love to honestly report that this cocktail hails from Moscow (or at least Russia), we can’t. It was created in New York in 1941, and its name refers to the vodka in the drink, a well-known Russian staple. Traditionally served in a copper mug, the drink is made with vodka, lime juice, and ginger beer.

Manhattan

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Manhattan is more than just a city; some say it’s a state of mind. Just like the city it’s named after, the Manhattan epitomizes class, style, and a certain je ne sais quoi. There are a dozen or so variations of this iconic drink, but the cocktail’s deceptively simple recipe — rye, vermouth, and bitters — makes it the perfect urban refreshment. 

Parisian Martini

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France, and by association Paris, may be known for its wine, but it also boasts a great variety of premium quality liqueurs, spirits, bitters, and tasty fruits and garnishes, so the sky’s the limit for bartenders. Perfect for holiday parties, the Parisian is a flirty martini made with crème de cassis and best served with a few currants. 

Singapore Sling

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The exact nature of the original recipe for the Singapore Sling is a little fuzzy (much like the way too much of the drink may make you feel); however, what we can say is that this tropical-inspired gin cocktail was created by one Ngaim Tong Boon, a Hainanese-Chinese bartender, who worked at the Long Bar at the Raffles Hotel in the early 1900s.

Boston Rum Punch

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Until Prohibition, Boston produced thousands of gallons of rum, which mainly ended up in rum punch. Consisting of rum which was made with Caribbean molasses, as was traditional in Boston in 1700, Boston Rum Punch was popular at places like the Green Dragon Tavern, which happens to be where the Boston Tea Party was planned. This easy punch is served with cracked ice in a pint glass.