8 Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog

By
Eggnog is a classic holiday drink, but there are some things you might not know about it
Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
iStock/Thinkstock

Eggnog is a classic holiday drink, but there are some things you might not know about it, like how it got its name, where the drink came from, and which U.S. president had his own eggnog recipe.

8 Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog

Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
iStock/Thinkstock

Eggnog is a classic holiday drink, but there are some things you might not know about it, like how it got its name, where the drink came from, and which U.S. president had his own eggnog recipe.

Origin of the Name

Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
Shutterstock

The origin of the name eggnog is still somewhat of a mystery to etymologists. It’s thought that the word could be derived from noggin, the Old English word for strong beer. Others credit the name to Colonial America when colonists called thick drinks grog, and eggnog was called egg-and-grog.

Descendent of the Hot Cocktail “Posset”

Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
Wikimedia

Eggnog is believed to be a descendent of a hot cocktail from the fourteenth century known as posset. The drink didn’t contain eggs but was made with sweetened and spiced milk and ale or wine. We would guess that over the years, egg was added.

National Eggnog Day

Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
iStock/Thinkstock

Christmas Eve is also National Eggnog Day, and what better excuse to drink a few rounds?

Also Known as Egg Milk Punch

Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
Shutterstock

Before it was known as eggnog, this traditional holiday drink was called egg milk punch.

George Washington’s Eggnog

Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
iStock/Thinkstock

Our nation’s first president served a drink very similar to eggnog at his holiday parties. His boozy recipe was made with three kinds of liquor: rye whiskey, rum, and sherry.

Eggnog Riot

Following a drunken Christmas party, a melee known as the Eggnog Riot took place at the United States Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., and lasted from Christmas Eve through Christmas morning in 1826. Two days before, cadets snuck in whiskey to make eggnog for the party, which is how the riot got its name.

Medicine

Things You Didn’t Know About Eggnog
Shutterstock

According to a medicinal book from the 1800s, eggnog used to be recommended as a treatment for various illnesses, including malaria.

An International Holiday Drink

Cultures around the world have their own versions of eggnog, like tamagozake from Japan and auld man’s milk from Scotland.