8 Beverages Pregnant Women Should Be Drinking (Slideshow)

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Quell your nausea, boost your folate: how to drink healthily during your pregnancy
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According to the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide, a study has shown that ginger, long used in traditional medicine as an anti-nauseant, may beneficial for women who are suffering from morning sickness. The study involved 70 pregnant women who experienced nausea during their pregnancy;  the majority of women who added ginger to their diet were less sick less frequently than those who did not.


Ginger Tea

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According to the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide, a study has shown that ginger, long used in traditional medicine as an anti-nauseant, may beneficial for women who are suffering from morning sickness. The study involved 70 pregnant women who experienced nausea during their pregnancy;  the majority of women who added ginger to their diet were less sick less frequently than those who did not.


Orange Juice

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You're probably aware thatit's important to increase your iron intake during your pregnancy, but did you know that some foods and drinks may help or hinder your ability to absorb the iron you’re consuming?  According to Nutrition During Pregnancy, a report published by the Institute of Medicine  of the National Academies, “Compared with water, orange juice will roughly double the absorption of nonheme iron from a meal. Tea and coffee, on the other hand, will cut the absorption of nonheme iron by more than half when compared with water.” Make sure you go with pasteurized juice, though!


Folate-Rich Smoothies

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In your first trimester, you need to up your folate intake considerably. Folate, or folic acid, is a water-soluble B-vitamin that helps your baby’s nervous system develop. It is great to take folate-rich supplements, but equally important to ingest folate-rich foods. One easy way to get more folates in your diet is through a quick smoothie.

Click here for our Folate-Rich Smoothie Recipe


Peppermint Tea

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In traditional medicine, peppermint tea has been used as a healthful drink for those suffering from morning sickness for a long time. An article published in Phytotherapy Research notes that “in vitro, peppermint has significant antimicrobial and antiviral activities, strong antioxidant and antitumor actions, and some antiallergenic potential.” In short, a few drops of peppermint oil in your teacup may be great for you and your fetus.


Banana-Yogurt Smoothie

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One large banana contains 4 grams of fiber and about 20 percent of your daily vitamin C and vitamin B6 needs. Vitamin B6 helps regulate your sodium and potassium levels, which can be imbalanced if you’re suffering from morning sickness. Bananas also contain high levels of magnesium and potassium, which are important for maintaining a healthy fluid balance.

According to The Panic-Free Pregnancy by Michael S Broder, “Yogurt contains bacteria that commonly lives in the intestinal tract and can actually be good for you – there is no link of any kind between eating yogurt and problems with pregnancy. In fact, yogurt is high in calcium and (if unflavored) relatively low in simple sugars.”


Water with Lemon

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Lemon’s fresh scent can be a wonderful, healthful anti-nauseant. You can just sniff a lemon half if you're feeling too queasy to keep anything down, but if your morning sickness is really causing you trouble, it's best to stay hydrated by drinking a glass of water wtih some lemon squeezed in. 


Coconut Water

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Coconut water is kind of amazing: it’s nature’s sports drink without all the added sugars. This drink can help you rehydrate naturally and healthily if you’ve been experiencing some awful morning sickness.

Red Raspberry Leaf Tea

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Midwives have used red raspberry leaf for generations to tone the uterine walls, aid in a smoother delivery, and calm cramping, this tea has been shown to have a relaxant effect on the uterus. However, there have not been many studies on red raspberry leaf, and there is not enough evidence to say that it will definitely help ease your birth. However, it is generally considered safe, so it may do you some good, and it won’t do any harm.