Death by Gumbo

Death by Gumbo
Staff Writer
Restaurant R’evolution

This gumbo was created for Craig Claiborne of The New York Times. When he asked chef Folse to come to his home on Long Island to create a special dinner depicting the evolution of Cajun and Creole cuisine, he knew this unusual dish would be the perfect choice.

Recipe courtesy of chefs John Folse and Rick Tramonto, Restaurant R’evolution

12
Servings
247
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the quail

  • 12 boneless Bobwhite quail
  • Salt and cracked black pepper. to taste
  • Granulated garlic, to taste
  • 1 1/2 Cup cooked white rice
  • 1 Teaspoon filé powder
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped parsley
  • Twelve 1/2-inch slices Andouille sausage
  • 12 oysters, poached in their liquid

For the gumbo

  • 12 Stuffed and seasoned Bobwhite quail
  • 1 Cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 Cup flour
  • 2 Cups diced onions
  • 2 Cups diced celery
  • 1 Cup diced bell peppers
  • 1/4 Cup minced garlic
  • 1 Cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1 Cup sliced Tasso
  • 3 quarts chicken stock
  • 1 Teaspoon thyme
  • Salt and cracked black pepper, to taste
  • Granulated garlic, to taste
  • 1 Cup sliced green onions
  • 1 Cup chopped parsley

Directions

For the quail

Season birds inside and out using salt, cracked black pepper and granulated garlic. Season cooked white rice to taste with salt, pepper, granulated garlic, filé powder, and chopped parsley. Stuff cavity of each quail with 1 tablespoon rice mixture, 1 slice Andouille, 1 oyster, and a second tablespoon of rice mixture. Continue this process until all birds have been stuffed. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

Chef's Note: Although it is best to use boneless quail for this recipe, you may also use bone-in birds if boneless is not available.

For the gumbo

In a 2-gallon stockpot, heat oil over medium-high heat. Whisk in flour, stirring constantly until a golden brown roux is achieved. Add onions, celery, bell peppers, and minced garlic. Sauté 3–5 minutes or until vegetables are wilted. Stir in mushrooms and tasso. Cook an additional 3 minutes then add chicken stock, 1 ladle at a time, stirring constantly. Stir in thyme, bring to a rolling boil, reduce to simmer and cook 30 minutes. Season to taste using salt, pepper, and granulated garlic. Place stuffed quail into gumbo and allow to simmer 30 minutes. When quail are tender and legs separate from body easily, remove birds to a platter and keep warm. Strain all seasonings from gumbo through a fine sieve and reserve gumbo liquid. Return stock to pot, add quail, green onions, and parsley then bring to a low boil. To serve, place 1 quail in center of each soup bowl and cover with gumbo liquid.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
5g
7%
Sugar
7g
8%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Cholesterol
65mg
22%
Carbohydrate, by difference
23g
18%
Protein
27g
59%
Vitamin A, RAE
9µg
1%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
2mg
3%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
8µg
9%
Calcium, Ca
46mg
5%
Choline, total
7mg
2%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
13µg
3%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
22mg
7%
Niacin
1mg
7%
Phosphorus, P
84mg
12%
Selenium, Se
9µg
16%
Sodium, Na
829mg
55%
Water
88g
3%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Gumbo Shopping Tip

Southern food is a mixture of Native American, Creole, and European influences. Staples of this comfort food include corn (in all its forms), honey, chicken, pork, and seafood, all easily found at any neighborhood grocery store.

Gumbo Cooking Tip

Southern and comfort food is often rich and heavy, be sure to include lots of greens and vegetables with these dishes.