Immune-Boosting Foods for Fall

By
If you want to stay healthy this fall, eating these foods may help
Shutterstock

Sweet potatoes have double immune-boosting power thanks to vitamin C and beta-carotene (an antioxidant that our body converts to vitamin A); both vitamin A and vitamin C are believed to support healthy immune system function.


Sweet Potatoes

Shutterstock

Sweet potatoes have double immune-boosting power thanks to vitamin C and beta-carotene (an antioxidant that our body converts to vitamin A); both vitamin A and vitamin C are believed to support healthy immune system function.


Garlic

Shutterstock

Get rid of germs before they can make you sick; laboratory test results show that garlic has anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal properties, giving it some serious infection-fighting potential.

Oats

Shutterstock

Oats are a good source of beta-glucans (naturally occurring sugars) that have been shown to promote a strong and healthy immune system. If you don’t like oats, try barley instead; it’s also a good source.

Yogurt

Shutterstock

When you’re choosing a yogurt, select one that contains live and active cultures (or “good” bacteria). The good bacteria that the probiotics support can have a positive impact on many aspects of your body’s immune response.

Mushrooms

Shutterstock

Mushrooms are a good natural source of selenium, an antioxidant that strongly influences immune response. Cremini and shiitake mushrooms are among the most selenium-rich.

Pumpkin Seeds

Shutterstock

Snacking on pumpkin seeds can help you boost your vitamin E intake. Vitamin E is recognized as a powerful antioxidant that helps maintain a healthy immune system, especially in older adults.


Ginger

Shutterstock

Ginger works to support immune health in more ways than one; it has anti-bacterial properties and helps prevent the accumulations of toxins that can make you susceptible to infections.


Chicken Soup

Shutterstock

It turns out, there’s some truth to the idea that chicken soup can cure a cold; chicken releases amino acids during cooking that resemble bronchitis-fighting medicine. Plus, many chicken soup recipes are loaded with vitamin-rich vegetables and infection-fighting garlic.