How Countries Eat Avocados Around the World (Slideshow)

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When soft and ripe, avocados have a rich and creamy flesh that can be used in both savory and sweet dishes
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In the Philippines, avocado is offered as an ice cream flavor alongside chocolate and vanilla. Traditional Filipino avocado ice cream is made with avocados, cream, and lemon juice, but adding coconut or chocolate into the mix can really brighten up the flavors. 

Philippines

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In the Philippines, avocado is offered as an ice cream flavor alongside chocolate and vanilla. Traditional Filipino avocado ice cream is made with avocados, cream, and lemon juice, but adding coconut or chocolate into the mix can really brighten up the flavors. 

Columbia

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Warm avocado dishes can be surprisingly delicious, and the Columbian avocado soup crema de aguacate, is no exception. The soup is a mix of avocados, cream, cumin, and fresh cilantro. Chicken stock is used as a base for the traditional version of this soup, but if you prefer a vegetarian version, just replace the chicken with vegetable stock.

Indonesia

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Southeast Asian countries also feature avocados to satisfy a sweet tooth. In Indonesia, jus alpukat is a popular dessert. The shake is creamy and sweet and combines avocado with sweet condensed milk and chocolate.


Spain

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In Spain, avocados are featured in many tapas recipes, but they’re also popular in salads. For a refreshing warm-weather meal, make an avocado and lime shrimp salad—called an ensalada de camarones con aguacate y limon.


Ethiopia

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In Ethiopia, layered fruit juices, called spris, feature avocado purée. A common spri layers papayas, avocados, and mango purées. To make spris at home, place papaya in a blender with water; add to the bottom of a tall glass. Purée avocado with a little water, lime juice, and sugar; layer on top of papaya purée. Top both purées with blended mango. Serve with a slice of lime.

Brazil

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In Brazil, avocados are prepared in a dish called creme de abacate, or avocado cream. The fruit’s smooth and delicate texture creates a luxurious sweet treat. In savory Brazilian dishes, avocados are halved and stuffed with ceviche, picadillo, or meat.



America

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When sushi made its way to California, a local sushi chef in Los Angeles substituted hard-to-find fatty tuna for avocados, and developed the California Roll, made of avocado, crab, and cucumber.

Mexico

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In Mexican dishes, avocados are served as a condiment to counteract the spicy chilies that often garnish specialities like flautas, tacos, panuchos, and tortilla soup. Some Mexican foods, like black beans and grilled meats, even call for avocado leaves as a seasoning, with a taste that’s reminiscent of anise. To put an Oaxacan spin on guacamole, add the local specialty of dried grasshoppers, or chapulines, for a crunchy and funky taste.