Champagne Gelée with Raspberries

Champagne Gelée with Raspberries
Staff Writer
Eva Zaccaria

In this champagne gelée, you’ll find champagne solidified with gelatin, ruby-red berries, and pomegranate seeds suspended within along with flecks of edible 23-karat gold leaf; it’s perfect for New Year’s Eve or any time you want a spirited, elegant dessert.

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6
Servings
163
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • One 750-milliliter bottle sparkling white wine, prosecco, or champagne
  • 3/4 Cups sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin, such as Knox
  • 1 Teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 1/3 Cup fresh raspberries
  • 1/4 Cup pomegranate seeds
  • 3 sheets of 23-karat gold leaf, optional

Directions

Coat a 4-cup mold with nonstick spray. Take a clean paper towel and remove most of it; you just want the slightest film of it on the inside of the mold. Alternately, have 6 clear glasses ready. (Their volume can vary but between 4 and 8 ounces is best.)

Pour about half the bottle of wine in a saucepan; you can do this by eye. Gently stir in sugar and allow any bubbles to subside. Sprinkle the gelatin evenly over the wine; do not let it clump in one spot. Allow the gelatin to soften for 5 minutes. Heat over medium heat, occasionally whisking gently for a few minutes or until sugar and gelatin are dissolved. Remove from heat and gently whisk in remaining sparkling wine. Let the mixture sit for a few moments for bubbles and foam to subside and skim off any remaining.

Refrigerate for 20 minutes and check texture. You want to catch it just as it is thickening. Check every 10 to 20 minutes until it has thickened but is still pourable.

Pour a little of the gelatin mixture into the prepared mold (or your glasses). Add a few berries and some pomegranate seeds and a bit of gold, which you can put in place with a tweezer. Add more gelatin mixture and repeat with fruit and gold until you have used up all of the gelatin. (You might have fruit left over.)

Refrigerate overnight. To unmold, fill a large, deep bowl with warm water. Dip the mold into the water for about 5 seconds and remove. Tip the mold gently and see if the edges of the gelatin are coming free. Place platter on top of mold and invert. Repeat warm-water technique if necessary. Serve cold. Gelée in glasses can be served as is. Serve with extra berries, if you like.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
8g
11%
Sugar
1g
1%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Carbohydrate, by difference
22g
17%
Protein
3g
7%
Vitamin A, RAE
118µg
17%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
10mg
13%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
185µg
100%
Calcium, Ca
87mg
9%
Choline, total
5mg
1%
Fiber, total dietary
4g
16%
Folate, total
46µg
12%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
36mg
11%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
1mg
7%
Phosphorus, P
41mg
6%
Selenium, Se
2µg
4%
Sodium, Na
22mg
1%
Water
48g
2%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Ham Shopping Tip

Bone-in cuts tend to be slightly less expensive than their boneless counterparts, and have more flavor.

Ham Cooking Tip

According to the USDA, the recommended internal temperature for cooked pork should be 145 degrees Fahrenheit.