Braised Collard Greens

Braised Collard Greens
Staff Writer
Thinkstock/iStockphoto

The trick to tough, leafy greens like collards is that there's no trick at all. Imparting flavor and breaking down their tough structure is as easy as bacon, onions, and chicken stock, and Justin Simoneaux of San Francisco's Boxing Room shows us how in this recipe. It's perfect for any weeknight meal or special occasions and holidays like Thanksgiving

4
Servings
897
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup thick-sliced bacon, diced
  • 4 Cups sliced yellow onion
  • 4 Tablespoons minced garlic
  • 3 bunches collard greens, cleaned and stemmed
  • 1 Cup chicken stock

Directions

Heat a 6-quart pot, preferably cast-iron, on medium heat and add the bacon; cook until bacon has started to crisp, about 5 minutes.

Lower the heat and add in the onions and cook slowly for 10-15 minutes or until the onions are soft.
Add in the garlic and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the collard greens and a ¼ of the chicken stock cover and let simmer check every 5-10 minutes and add the chicken stock if needed.

Let simmer for 30-45 minutes or until the greens are very soft. Season with salt and pepper.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
60g
86%
Sugar
14g
16%
Saturated Fat
22g
92%
Cholesterol
105mg
35%
Carbohydrate, by difference
61g
47%
Protein
28g
61%
Vitamin A, RAE
6µg
1%
Vitamin B-6
1mg
77%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
2mg
3%
Calcium, Ca
286mg
29%
Choline, total
32mg
8%
Fiber, total dietary
3g
12%
Folate, total
116µg
29%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
48mg
15%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
11mg
79%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
302mg
43%
Selenium, Se
34µg
62%
Sodium, Na
1366mg
91%
Thiamin
1mg
91%
Vitamin D (D2 + D3)
1µg
7%
Water
159g
6%
Zinc, Zn
2mg
25%

Collard Green Shopping Tip

Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium.

Collard Green Cooking Tip

Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.