Sandwich of the Week: Shelsky Smoked Fish's Brooklyn Native

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This Sandwich of the Week is an iconic New York City dish
Sandwich of the Week: Shelsky Smoked Fish's Brooklyn Native
Yelp/Caroline C

Brooklyn is the ultimate haven for specialty food shops. From the classic Guss’ Pickles, which has been open since 1920 in Manhattan’s Lower East Side and recently moved to Brooklyn under the name Ess-A-Pickle, to the soon-to-open gourmet mayonnaise shop Empire Mayo, you can find pretty much any specialty food you want in Brooklyn. However, up until this past summer, there was not a single specialty food shop around dedicated to appetizing. Appetizing is most easily explained as food that you would eat with a bagel: from smoked salmon and white fish to homemade salads and cream cheeses. These stores started opening in reflection of Jewish dietary laws, which prohibit selling or consuming meat and dairy products together; appetizing shops sell dairy and fish, and delicatessens sell cured and pickled meat. Early in the 20th century, Eastern European Jewish immigrants brought appetizing cuisine to New York, and today that legacy is an emblematic food of the city: a bagel with lox and cream cheese. What says New York more than that?

Ironically, the bagel-lox-and-cream-cheese legacy is part of the problem, contributing to the slow disappearance of the appetizing shops that used to be a dime a dozen in New York. The ubiquity of this classic New York combo has cast a large shadow over the other important components of appetizing — whitefish salad, pickled herring, sturgeon, and sable, to name a few — and the shops have become nearly obsolete. Russ and Daughters, a stalwart of the Lower East Side, has been "appetizing since 1914" and is thankfully still going strong. It is one of the only remaining stores in a neighborhood that used to be home to more than 30 appetizing shops, and happens to have some of the best whitefish salad on the planet. Brooklyn, for all its specialty food shops and Jewish roots, was sorely lacking an appetizing shop until Shelsky’s Smoked Fish opened in Carroll Gardens.

Peter Shelsky opened the store because he was tired of schlepping into Manhattan for whitefish, and he is restoring some heritage to the borough in the process. For a brilliant combination of all of the best that Shelsky’s has to offer, the "Brooklyn Native" is the perfect sandwich — Gaspe Nova, smoked Whitefish Salad, pickled herring, and sour pickles are served on a bagel or bialy. I am partial to the bialy, which is every so slightly toasted so as not to sacrifice the fluffy middle. The sandwich begins with a layer of creamy whitefish salad, which, made with chopped cucumber and celery, has just the right amount of crunch. Next comes two layers of Gaspe Nova so fresh it practically melts in your mouth. Not overly smoky, this Nova goes really well with the next layer, a slightly sweet piece of pickled herring that is much meatier than the salmon, offering a unique consistency in addition to the new flavor. Finally, a few sour pickles top off the salty stack, all enveloped, of course, by the bagel or bialy. The distinct texture of each component in the "Brooklyn Native" is an integral part of this sandwich’s character.

Other Shelsky’s sandwiches, like the "Member of the Tribe" (Gaspe Nova, scallion or plain cream cheese served on a bagel) or the namesake "Peter Shelsky" (Gaspe Nova, sable, pickled herring with cream sauce and onion, scallion cream cheese served on bagel or bialy) offer similarly complex, flavor-packed options. "The Great Gatsby" (pastrami cured salmon, horseradish cream cheese, honey mustard, and red onion) or the "Dr. Goldstein Special"(duck fat-laced chopped liver and apple horseradish sauce served between two schmaltz-fried potato latkes) take tradition to a whole new level.  For those new to the cuisine, Shelsky’s sandwiches are a great introduction to the world of appetizing — a world that will hopefully see a revival in the city where it really came of age. Head down to Carroll Gardens (historically not a Jewish neighborhood, as it were), for a taste of authentic appetizing, and some of the best sandwiches this side of the bridge.

Click here for other featured sandwiches or check out the 52 Best Sandwiches of 2011. Know a sandwich that should be featured? Email The Daily Meal or comment below. Better yet, become a contributor and write up your favorite today!