3D Printed Pizza Is Almost Here, But How Will It Taste?

3D Food printers may be coming to a store near you soon, companies claim the food will taste like the real thing
Natural Machines

A pizza is just one of the many foods capable of being made by the Foodini 3D Printer.

It may sound like an episode of The Jetsons, but scientists and 3D printers claim that pretty soon, you’ll be able to print your Friday night dinner instead of getting takeout. Already, these futuristic devices have shown capabilities of making prosthetic limbs, cars and even stem cells, according to The Huffington Post. 

So the question on everyone’s mind is, what will 3D printed food taste like? The answer, according to 3DSystems Manager Alyssa Reichental, is that your taste buds won’t know the difference, but your eyes will.

“In terms of looks, 3D printed food literally breaks the mold and can take on all sorts of complex and ornate sculptural shapes, or stay simple and familiar,” Reichental told us. “The taste is like other sweets and candies; it is the final form and process that are different.” “In terms of looks, 3D printed food literally breaks the mold and can take on all sorts of complex and ornate sculptural shapes, or stay simple and familiar,” said Alyssa Reichental.

Already, 3DSystems has a partnership with Hershey’s to create the ultimate printed cocoa candy, though right now, printing your own Mr. Goodbars is still a thing of the future.  The printer will have the capability of forming candies into unusual shapes and sizes.

But if you’re in the mood for something more savory, you may want to keep an eye on “The Foodini,” powered by Natural Machines, which can make pastas (ravioli, spaghetti and gnocchi), burgers, chicken nuggets and pizza, as well as some tempting desserts. The Foodini connects to the Internet, where users can select a recipe, input fresh ingredients and click print.

“Today, too many people eat too much convenience foods, or pre-processed foods, or pre-made meals,” Lynette Kucsma, CMO of Natural Machines, told The Daily Meal. “With Foodini, you can make your own versions of these convenience foods by creating healthier versions made with fresh ingredients.”

Other printed foods in the making, according to Business Week, are corn chips and chickpea nuggets for the vegetarian printing fan. 

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