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Rabbit Is Good for You: Here Are the 9 Best Ways to Cook It

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Welcome spring with one of these delicious, nutritious rabbit recipes
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Rabbit Is Good for You: Here Are the 9 Best Ways to Cook It

Rabbit is considered a healthier meat because is almost cholesterol-free and lower in sodium than most meats, but, unlike the animals who yield other, more commonly eaten proteins, have one big downfall: They’re cute. If you’re able to look past a rabbit’s obvious visual appeal, though, you’ll see that these eco-friendly animals can act as a nutritious food source.

Braised Rabbit

Braised Rabbit With Broccoli Rabe, Pearl Onions, and Cauliflower Mousse
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Country Rabbit and Grits

Country Rabbit and Broken Rice Grits
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This recipe uses bacon lardons, onion, garlic, peppers, crushed tomatoes, and ginger to make a crispy confit rabbit and rice grits, garnished with toasted almonds and fresh dill and mint.

Click here for the Country Rabbit and Broken Rice Grits recipe.

Faire’s Rabbit Stew

Faire’s Rabbit Stew
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Chef Steve Zanini of Faire Steak and Seafood in Raleigh suggests using duck fat for this rabbit stew recipe. “Duck fat has better health qualities than chicken fat does. Plus the taste [of] duck fat is marvelous!"

Click here for Faire’s Rabbit Stew recipe.

Ground Rabbit Stew

Ground Rabbit Stew

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“Ground rabbit is delicious, but not always easy to find. Have your butcher order a rabbit and grind it for you for this recipe. Rabbit is low-fat and I prefer using it ground, as it does not dry out,” says Melanie Underwood, Chef Instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education in NYC.

Click here for the Ground Rabbit Stew recipe.

Lapin au Vin

lapin au vin
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This rustic rabbit stew is prepared in the style of that famous French classic, coq au vin. The braised vegetables become incredibly rich during the cooking process thanks to the bacon, bacon fat, rabbit juices, and white wine. In an unusual twist, the rabbit meat actually lightens the rich vegetables, rather than the other way around.

Click here for the Lapin au Vin recipe.

Nonna’s Rabbit

Nonna’s Rabbit
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With red bell pepper, olives, parsley, a bit of white wine, heart-healthy olive oil, and rabbit, there isn’t one unhealthy ingredient in Nonna’s Rabbit recipe.

Click here for Nonna’s Rabbit recipe.

Prosciutto-Wrapped Rabbit Loins

prosciutto
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The crisped prosciutto wrapper gives this dish big pork flavor while protecting the rabbit meat so it stays tender and juicy. The sweet prunes and savory ramps on the inside are a delightful surprise.

Click here for the Prosciutto-Wrapped Rabbit Loins recipe.

Rabbit and Dumplin’s

Rabbit and Dumplin’s

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Sure, this dumpling recipe uses butter and some self-rising flour, so if that’s not healthy enough for you, try subbing in coconut oil and whole wheat flour. Still, we say splurging on this recipe is a decision that your taste buds certainly won’t regret.

Click here for the Rabbit and Dumplin’s recipe.

Spring Rabbit Guinness Stew

Spring Rabbit Guinness Stew
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This stew recipe uses ramps, a vegetable only found during spring. It also incorporates Guinness, rendering it a hearty stew that can be enjoyed on a cool spring evening.

Click here for the Spring Rabbit Guinness Stew recipe.