Rabbit and Dumplin’s

Tasty, healthy rabbit and easy dumplings
rabbit and dumplings

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“Most Americans don’t realize that a pound of rabbit meat only has about 800 calories. Additionally, it contains less fat and only about half of the cholesterol of some more commonly used proteins like chicken and pork. Rabbits are one of the most productive domestic livestock animals available. Given the same amount of feed and water, a rabbit can produce roughly six pounds of meat whereas a cow will only produce one pound.” – Chef Anthony Gray of Bacon Bros. Public House in Greenville

4
Servings
2406
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the rabbit:

  • 4  Cups  celery, one-inch dice
  • 6  Cups  onion, one-inch dice
  • 1  Cup  chopped leeks
  • 10  cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 3 to 3.5  Pound  rabbit
  • bay leaves
  • bunch thyme
  • bunch tarragon
  • 6  Dashes of table sauce
  • black pepper corns
  • 2  Tablespoons  each of chopped parsley, tarragon, and chives
  • 1  Tablespoon  unsalted butter
  • 1/4  Cup  all-purpose flour
  • Salt and pepper

For the dumplings:

  • 3  Cups  self-rising flour, such as White Lily self-rising flour
  • 3/4  Tablespoons  table salt
  • 4 1/2  Tablespoons  cold unsalted butter
  • 1  Cup  buttermilk (or just enough to make the dough stick together)

Directions

For the rabbit:

Season your rabbit generously with salt and pepper and allow to sit refrigerated for 24 hours. If you don’t have that time just let sit for an hour while you prepare the other ingredients.

In a large pot add the rabbit and cover with cold water, bring the water to a simmer, skimming any unwanted foam and fat from the top. At this time add two cups of onions, ½ cup of leeks, two cups celery, the thyme, bay leaves, and peppercorns. Cover and allow to simmer for an hour or so until the rabbit is very tender.

Carefully remove the rabbit and allow to cool so that you can pick the meat from the bones. Strain the cooking liquid (keeping warm), reserving it and throwing out the solids.

In another heavy bottom pot add the butter and allow to melt. Once the butter is melted, add the flour and stir it in for five to eight minutes. Cook on medium-low.

Add the remaining vegetables and cook for 10 minutes or so until they become tender. At this point add the garlic and cook for another two minutes.

Slowly add the reserved broth and allow to simmer for 20 minutes or until the broth has slightly thickened, seasoning with salt and pepper and hot sauce. Taste the seasoning then add the picked rabbit meat.

Add the dumplings and cook for another 20 minutes. Finish with chopped parsley, chives, and tarragon

For the dumplings:

Mix flour and salt together in bowl.

Cut butter into flour mixture with fingertips until it resembles small peas.

Add buttermilk, 1/4 cup at a time, and stir until a ball of dough just begins to form, being careful not to over-mix.

Roll out the dough onto floured surface, about ¼ inch thick sharp knife. Cut dough into rectangles or squares.

Place the dumplings on a floured pan, dividing layers with parchment paper.

Let the dumplings rest in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before adding to the stew.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
72g
100%
Sugar
24g
27%
Saturated Fat
24g
100%
Cholesterol
480mg
100%
Carbohydrate, by difference
233g
100%
Protein
198g
100%
Vitamin A, RAE
17µg
2%
Vitamin B-12
10µg
100%
Vitamin B-6
4mg
100%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
4mg
5%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
10µg
11%
Calcium, Ca
1136mg
100%
Choline, total
421mg
99%
Copper, Cu
1mg
0%
Fiber, total dietary
13g
52%
Folate, total
565µg
100%
Iron, Fe
26mg
100%
Magnesium, Mg
225mg
70%
Manganese, Mn
3mg
100%
Niacin
57mg
100%
Pantothenic acid
6mg
100%
Phosphorus, P
2613mg
100%
Riboflavin
3mg
100%
Selenium, Se
269µg
100%
Sodium, Na
6377mg
100%
Thiamin
3mg
100%
Water
716g
27%
Zinc, Zn
32mg
100%

Rabbit Shopping Tip

Ingredients like olive oil, shallots, mustard, cream, stock, and butter will help bring French flavors to your cooking.

Rabbit Cooking Tip

French cuisine is renowned for slow-cooked sauces, however a quick pan sauce will do just as well; after sautéing a piece of meat or fish, remove it from the pan, deglaze with brandy or wine, finish with a touch of butter or cream and voilà!