Fried Ice Cream from 15 Most Difficult but Impressive Desserts to Make

15 Most Difficult but Impressive Desserts to Make

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15 Most Difficult but Impressive Desserts to Make

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15 Most Difficult but Impressive Desserts to Make

You know the phrase, “good things come to those who wait?” Well, some of these dessert recipes will test your skills and patience as a baker. Whether it’s the long, arduous process of soaking fruit cakes, defying temptation to open your oven as the chocolate soufflés rise, or the tedious, multi-step process required to make the mile-high meringue, we’ve rounded up 15 of the most difficult dessert recipes that, if mastered, are sure to impress your dinner guests come dessert time.

For more on how to make these difficult, but impressive desserts, check out our round up of 15 classic dessert recipes and tips you should know.

Baked Alaska

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Baked Alaska

Layers of cake and ice cream are assembled before being artfully covered in whipped meringue that is then lightly toasted in the oven for this classic dessert.

For the Baked Alaska recipe, click here.

Baklava

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Baklava

Working with phyllo dough requires patience. The delicate layers are prone to tearing and drying and require a quick assemble of the honeyed Greek dessert.

For the Baklava recipe, click here.

Chocolate Soufflé

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Chocolate Soufflé

Chocolate soufflé is a notoriously difficult dessert. Meringues are sensitive to humidity, temperature, and movement, so taking the time to delicately whip and fold the meringue, plus patiently waiting to open the oven until the buzzer goes off will up your chances of baking the perfect chocolate soufflé.  

For the Chocolate Soufflé recipe, click here.

Clafoutis

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Clafoutis

Clafoutis is simple enough once you get the hang of it, but as with all baked custard desserts there is a learning curve. Under-bake and the dessert tastes eggy and runs, overbake and the dry, chalky custard won’t impress anyone.

For the Clafoutis recipe, click here.

Crème Brûlée

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Crème Brûlée

The classic French dessert with a hard caramelized top requires gentle baking of a custard, and then torching the sugar top. The trick to crème brûlée is cooking the custard until it shimmies, but does not shake. Too firm, and your custard will have an unpleasant curdled texture.

For the Crème Brûlée recipe, click here.

Crème Caramel

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Crème Caramel

The challenge with crème caramel is not only perfecting the custard, but also the caramel, which needs enough color for that complex caramel taste without cooking too long and developing a burnt, bitter aftertaste.

For the Crème Caramel recipe, click here.

Croquembouche

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Croquembouche

This caramelized tower of cream puffs is also known as a French Wedding Cake. The Individual cream puffs are dipped in caramel and stacked to form a tower.

For the Croquembouche recipe, click here.

Eclairs

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Eclairs

What makes eclairs so difficult to pull off? Three time-consuming components: choux dough, pastry cream, and chocolate glaze. Once you get a hang of the technique, you can experiment with unusual flavorings and fillings for this classic French bakery staple.

For the Eclairs recipe, click here.

Fried Ice Cream

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Fried Ice Cream

Hot, deep-fried food and cold, frozen ice cream wouldn’t make a winning pair — or so you think. This recipe makes the seemingly impossible come true, and truth be told, it’s not as difficult as it sounds.

For the Fried Ice Cream recipe, click here.

Fruit Cakes

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Fruit Cakes

This popular holiday cake is a labor of love. The assembly alone requires a bevy of ingredients, and then the cakes must be baked for hours, followed by a long soaking in syrup.

For the Fruit Cake recipe, click here.

Lemon Meringue Pie

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Lemon Meringue Pie

Lemon meringue pie is a perfectly balanced dessert marked by swirling peaks of sweet, nearly weightless meringue atop a rich mouth-puckering filling. A few tricks are in order, however, to help prevent common mishaps, such as a soggy crust or runny filling. First, the crust must be fully blind-baked so that it gets crisp and firm. A half-butter, half-shortening crust like the one used here has a pleasantly crumbly, tender texture. (Substitute an all-butter crust, if you prefer.) The stove-top custard filling is thickened with egg yolks and cornstarch. It must come to a full boil and then cook for several minutes in order to activate the cornstarch and thicken properly. — Martha Stewart’s Pies & Tarts

For the Lemon Meringue Pie recipe, click here.

Macarons

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Macarons

These light-as-air meringue cookies that are usually filled with buttercream or jam, require a delicate hand when mixing the whipped egg whites.

For the Macarons recipe, click here.

Napoleon

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Napoleon

To make this elaborate French dessert, you have to bake sheets of docked puff pastry in between sheet pans to suppress the rise. The result is a crisp wafer-like layer that you then alternate with pastry cream, whipped cream, or jam.

For the Napoleon recipe, click here.

Plum Pudding

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Plum Pudding

Real plum pudding requires an extensive soaking in liquor before the cake is ready to be served.

For the Plum Pudding recipe, click here.

Tiramisu

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Tiramisu

Homemade ladyfingers will make your tiramisu go from tasty to exquisite. Soak them in espresso before layering with whipped filling.

For the Tiramisu recipe, click here.

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15 Most Difficult but Impressive Desserts to Make

15 Most Difficult but Impressive Desserts to Make

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