10 Southern Wedding Traditions Every Bride Will Love Slideshow

You don’t need to truly be Southern to be a Southern bride

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10 Southern Wedding Traditions Every Bride Will Love

10 Southern Wedding Traditions Every Bride Will Love

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Each Southern wedding tradition, even the more obscure ones, is marked with beautiful symbolism that can be great for every couple and family planning a wedding. Don’t believe us? Check out these 10 charming traditions and consider incorporating them into your own wedding day.

Bridal Portraits

Bridal Portraits

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You never look as stunning as you do on your wedding day, and brides in the South know it. After getting a hair and makeup trial or on the big day itself before they walk down the aisle, brides will take a series of solo portraits to document the day. This tradition has spread across the U.S., but it started down South.

Burying the Bourbon

Burying the Bourbon

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The South loves its bourbon so much, there’s an entire wedding superstition about it. To avoid rain ruining your wedding day, couples will bury a bottle of bourbon upside down at their ceremony site one month before their big day.

Cake Ribbon Pull

Cake Ribbon Pull

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Tossing the bouquet isn’t the only activity for single ladies at Southern weddings. Stemming from New Orleans, the cake ribbon pull involves the bride hiding small charms attached to string in the wedding cake and having her girlfriends each pull out a token. Each charm has a hidden meaning, such as a four-leaf clover for good luck or a hot air balloon for a new adventure.

Groom’s Cakes

Groom’s Cakes

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Traditionally shaped as an armadillo, the playful groom’s cake has roots in a similar tradition from Victorian England wherein the groom ate an alcohol-soaked fruit cake on his wedding day. Today, groom’s cakes are an expression of the groom’s interests, from Star Wars to barbecuing to cars. The towering, tiered cake is said to be for the bride.

House Party

House Party

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Everyone with an intimate connection to the bride and groom is given a job on the wedding day as a gesture of importance. Known as a “house party,” cousins, siblings, and close friends are given special tasks, such as overlooking the guest book, greeting guests, or doing a reading at the ceremony. However, unlike bridesmaids and groomsmen, they don’t stand at the altar.

Massive Wedding Parties

Massive Wedding Parties

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Everything is bigger in the South, including bridal parties. In addition to house parties, it’s not odd to see bridal parties that take up a sizable percentage of wedding guests. In an attempt not to offend anybody, brides and grooms will reach out to childhood friends, siblings, cousins, and their brothers and sisters in Greek life to give them the designation of bridesmaid or groomsman.

Pounding Parties

Pounding Parties

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This pre-ceremony tradition is half wedding shower, half housewarming party. Despite its snicker-worthy name, family and friends don’t beat on the engaged couple. Instead, they bring pantry staples, such as flour, butter, spices, and other dry goods by the pound. Get it?

Second Line Parade

Second Line Parade

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Big brass bands down in New Orleans have two lines: the first line, which includes the band, and the second line, which includes merry revelers who just want to march down the street. In this joyful showing, the bride and groom march through the streets with the band, as guests wave handkerchiefs and march behind as the second line.

Seersucker Suits

Seersucker Suits

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If you know one thing about the American South, it’s that it’s really, really frickin’ hot down there, especially during the summer. Thus, black, four-piece tuxedos are simply not practical for men to wear. Enter: the seersucker suit. Lightly colored, made of cotton, and gentlemanly to the max, this Southern suit is perfect for all warm-weather grooms.

Southern Cuisine

Southern Cuisine

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Southern food is the most iconic American cuisine, so it’s only logical that Southern weddings are all about food. Shrimp and grits, fried chicken drumsticks, macaroni and cheese, gumbo… All of this lowcountry cuisine transcends the South itself and is a welcome addition to any wedding menu.