The Perfect Eggs Benedict

The Perfect Eggs Benedict
Staff Writer
Eggs Benedict
Thinkstock/Stockbyte

Eggs Benedict

While the dish's history is muddled, it doesn't take away from the fact that it's delicious. To make the perfect one, you have to remember the four components of the dish: the bread, the meat, the egg, and the sauce. As long as you follow the basic principles behind each of these, you can create any type of eggs Benedict you crave — just make sure it has hollandaise. 

1
Servings
437
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the hollandaise sauce

  • 1/2 Cup unsalted butter
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Pinch of salt

For the eggs Benedict

  • 2 lemon juice or vinegar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 pieces Canadian bacon
  • 1 English muffin, halved, toasted, and buttered
  • Paprika, for garnish
  • Chopped chives, for garnish

Directions

For the hollandaise sauce

In a small saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat. Don’t stir as it melts. You want the milky solids to fall to the bottom and the butter fat to float to the top. Keep warm.

Pour water to a depth of 1-2 inches into a medium saucepan and place over medium heat. Rest a medium stainless-steel bowl in the pan over (not touching) the water. Put the egg yolks, lemon juice, water, and ¼ teaspoon salt in the bowl and start whisking. As the bowl heats up, the yolks will begin to thicken. Whisk vigorously, scraping around the bowl with a heat-resistant rubber spatula from time to time so that bits of yolk don’t get stuck and overcook. Beat until thick and frothy but not quite fluffy, 3-4 minutes. The whisk will start leaving a clear space on the bottom of the bowl. Remove the bowl from the heat and whisk for another 30 seconds or so to stabilize the sauce and let the bowl cool down.

Continue whisking as you slowly drizzle in the warm melted butter, taking care not to add the milky-watery layer from the bottom of the pan. As you pour and whisk, make sure the yolks are accepting the butter and the yolks and butter are emulsifying. If the sauce looks at all broken or "curdly," stop adding butter and just whisk for a few seconds. Only resume adding butter once you’ve whisked the sauce into creaminess again.

For the eggs Benedict

Bring a large deep pot of water to a rolling boil. Add 1-2 tablespoons of acid to the water. As soon as the water reaches a rolling boil, lower the heat to a gentle simmer. Crack the eggs, 1 at a time, into a bowl and then add to the simmering water. Cook for 1-2 minutes, until the eggs are cooked through and white all over. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Meanwhile, heat a small skillet over medium-high heat and fry the Canadian bacon, about 2 minutes per side, until heated through and crisp and brown on both sides. Place a piece of bacon on each of the muffin halves, then top with the poached eggs and a drizzle of hollandaise sauce. Garnish with paprika and chives. 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
12g
17%
Saturated Fat
3g
13%
Carbohydrate, by difference
72g
55%
Protein
9g
20%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
2mg
3%
Calcium, Ca
120mg
12%
Fiber, total dietary
3g
12%
Folate, total
126µg
32%
Iron, Fe
5mg
28%
Magnesium, Mg
28mg
9%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
5mg
36%
Phosphorus, P
106mg
15%
Sodium, Na
770mg
51%
Thiamin
1mg
91%
Water
18g
1%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Eggs Benedict Shopping Tip

The fresher the better. Eggs in supermarkets don't even have half the flavor of fresh eggs. Try to make some time and head to the nearest farmer's market and treat yourself to some farm fresh eggs. They may be pricier but you get every cent back in flavor and a golden orange yolk.

Eggs Benedict Cooking Tip

With eggs, cooking at a low temperature is almost always preferred. It allows the eggs to keep better texture. Also if you ever mix your uncooked and hard boiled eggs, do not fret. A trick to distinguish the two is a spin on the counter top. Hard boiled eggs will spin with ease while uncooked eggs won't get any momentum.