spoon baby
Dreamstime

A Spoonful of Powder Makes Kids’ Allergies Go Down

Your kids can follow up this spoonful of sugar with peanut butter, no problem
spoon baby
Dreamstime

Since you can add the powder into any food or drink, babies think it tastes great.

You need to start feeding your kids a new product called SpoonfulOne Daily Food Mix-In before bedtime. They’ll think it’s a spoonful of sugar, but what’s really in this daily dosage is a blend of the world’s most common allergens.

Don’t panic — your child won’t erupt into hives after a single spoonful. Instead, their bodies will get the chance to build their immune system. The product will protect against future allergies early on, before it’s too late and you’re stuck buying them expensive EpiPens and vetoing Reese’s-distributing houses on Halloween.

The supplement is safe enough to start giving to babies as young as 4 months old, and is designed to gradually get the body used to the foods that are responsible for 90 percent of all children’s allergies. Each spoonful contains minute amounts of peanuts, milk, soy, wheat, shellfish, cashews, sesame, and other common allergens.

“Proactive is better than reactive,” co-founder Ashley Dombkowski told Fast Company. “Our product was designed to be the most carefully selected, most inclusive set of proteins ever developed for this.”

With over 6 million children affected by allergies each year and over 30 percent of all children experiencing multiple allergies, this product could be a promising mode of protection against America’s growing problem.

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However, it isn’t foolproof. The website warns: “Scientists don’t yet know how long food allergens should be included in the diet to support and educate the immune system.” As such, SpoonfulOne recommends long-term use of the product. While it’s not ideal to continuously funnel your funds into this company’s subscription service, it could be worth a try — at least until early childhood reveals whether your kid can feel safe at allergen-filled birthday parties.