Vietnamese Shaken Beef Tartare

Staff Writer
Vietnamese Shaken Beef Tartare
Vietnamese Shaken Beef Tartare
William Brinson

Vietnamese Shaken Beef Tartare

Shaken beef is a traditional Vietnamese dish, typically "shaken" in a wok. Tartare is a classic French dish — chopped beef served raw. I’ve fused these two greats to come up with something I think you’ll find very cool — not to mention absolutely delicious.

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Ready in
About 20 m
4
Servings
425
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

*Note: Gochujang is a Korean fermented chile paste, traditionally aged in clay pots. It's used as a condiment in many Korean dishes, and is available at Asian markets.

Ingredients

  • 1 Pound sirloin beef
  • 2 Tablespoons grapeseed oil
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon gochujang paste*
  • 1 Tablespoon lime juice
  • 2 Tablespoons seasoned rice-wine vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon Sriracha
  • 2 Teaspoons grated ginger
  • 1 1/2 Teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 Teaspoon sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped fresh mint

Directions

Mince the beef and set aside. Place a large sauté pan over high heat. When the pan is piping hot, remove it from the heat, add the grapeseed oil, swirl to coat the bottom of the pan, add the meat, and toss quickly until just coated in the oil (the beef will still be raw, but "shaken"). Transfer the meat to a bowl and immediately place in the refrigerator.

In a separate bowl, combine the olive oil, gochujang paste, lime juice, vinegar, fish sauce, Sriracha, ginger, salt, and sugar. Mix until the sugar is dissolved. Add the chilled beef, sesame seeds, and mint. Toss gently to combine and serve.

Vietnamese Shopping Tip

To find the ingredients you need to cook Southeast Asian cuisine, try to find specialty grocery stores in the Asian neighborhoods in your town.

Vietnamese Cooking Tip

Southeast Asian Cuisine is about the balance of flavors between sweet and sour; hot and mild. When working with Asian chilis, the smaller ones are usually spicier. Handle with caution and care.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
35g
53%
Sugar
2g
N/A
Saturated Fat
9g
44%
Cholesterol
88mg
29%
Protein
24g
48%
Carbs
4g
1%
Vitamin A
3µg
N/A
Vitamin B12
1µg
22%
Vitamin B6
0.7mg
34%
Vitamin C
4mg
7%
Vitamin E
4mg
19%
Vitamin K
9µg
11%
Calcium
60mg
6%
Fiber
0.6g
2.4%
Folate (food)
22µg
N/A
Folate equivalent (total)
22µg
5%
Iron
2mg
13%
Magnesium
50mg
13%
Monounsaturated
16g
N/A
Niacin (B3)
8mg
38%
Phosphorus
229mg
33%
Polyunsaturated
7g
N/A
Potassium
414mg
12%
Riboflavin (B2)
0.1mg
7.2%
Sodium
1019mg
42%
Sugars, added
1g
N/A
Zinc
4mg
29%

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