Warm Salad of Kabocha and Goat Cheese with Currant Raisins Recipe

Warm Salad of Kabocha and Goat Cheese with Currant Raisins Recipe
Staff Writer
Kabochas
Stock.XCHNG/alexiares

Kabochas

Here’s a great, seasonal starter for two that’s quick and easy to make. (You could even use a toaster oven to make this.) Goat cheese is browned on top of slices of kabocha squash, and paired with a simple salad of frisée.

2
Servings
595
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 2 slices kabocha squash, seeded and halved
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 4 ounces goat cheese
  • 3 ounces frisée
  • 1 teaspoon chives, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon currant raisins
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon toasted pumpkin seeds, for garnish

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. 

Rub the kabocha with the olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper, to taste. Place on a baking sheet and roast until lightly browned at the edges and soft. 

Turn the oven to broil. Fill the cavities of the squash with the goat cheese and broil until soft throughout and browned. Place the frisée, chives, and raisins in a bowl and toss with the vinegar, extra-virgin olive oil, salt, and pepper. Serve with the kabocha and goat cheese, garnished with the pumpkin seeds.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
53g
76%
Sugar
3g
3%
Saturated Fat
41g
100%
Cholesterol
59mg
20%
Carbohydrate, by difference
12g
9%
Protein
20g
43%
Vitamin A, RAE
358µg
51%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
17mg
23%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
3µg
3%
Calcium, Ca
530mg
53%
Choline, total
14mg
3%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
12µg
3%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
74mg
23%
Niacin
2mg
14%
Phosphorus, P
449mg
64%
Riboflavin
1mg
91%
Selenium, Se
5µg
9%
Sodium, Na
448mg
30%
Water
22g
1%
Zinc, Zn
2mg
25%

Salad Shopping Tip

Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium.

Salad Cooking Tip

Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.

Salad Wine Pairing

Salads with vinegar-based dressings don't go well with wine. Albariño, torrontés, or riesling with seafood or poultry salads in mayonnaise- or cream-based dressings; pinot gris/grigio, sauvignon blanc, sémillion, or grüner veltliner with salads with lemon juice-based dressings.