Rare Roast Beef with Gravy

Rare Roast Beef with Gravy
Contributor
Rare Roast Beef with Gravy
Dan Jones

Rare Roast Beef with Gravy

Thin slices of rare beef and a river of golden gravy is a kitchen essential. This less traditional method of roasting is my default. The lower temperature makes for supremely tender meat and elevates lesser cuts of meat, making it great for bottom round as well as the sirloin suggested here, which is for more of a special treat. — Anne Bell, Low Carb Revolution : Comfort Eating for Good Health.

6
Servings
156
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

For an even richer flavor, you could use a little Madeira or medium sherry in place of the same amount of red wine here.

Ingredients

For the beef:

  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 3-pound sirloin roast
  • 1 scant teaspoon English mustard powder
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 heaping tablespoon grainy mustard

For the gravy:

  • 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4 Cups mixture of diced onion, celery, carrot, and leek
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2/3 Cups red wine
  • 1 2/3 Cup beef stock

Directions

For the beef:

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F

Heat the oil in a large frying pan with a heatproof handle over high heat. Use a tea strainer or small sieve to dust the fat and underside of the roast with the mustard powder, and season it. Sear on all sides until golden — the ends, too — it should be well browned because you’re roasting at a low temperature. Brush half the grainy mustard over the bottom of the meat with a pastry brush, and the rest over the top. Transfer the beef in the frying pan to the oven and roast for 50 minutes for rare, then remove from the oven, loosely cover with foil, and leave it to rest for 20 minutes. (I have a habit of forgetting that the handle of the pan is hot, so leaving a towel wrapped around it isn’t a bad idea.) Thinly carve and serve with the gravy the cold meat is also great sandwich material.

For the gravy:

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat, add the vegetables, and cook for 30 to 35 minutes, stirring occasionally, until really well browned, almost black. Add the garlic a few minutes before the end, and then gradually pour in the red wine, and cook for a couple of minutes. Stir in the stock in two or three additions, add some strong seasoning, and simmer for about 5 minutes. Pass the gravy through a sieve, pressing out as much as possible from the vegetables. If it tastes at all thin, you can simmer it for a few minutes longer, and check the seasoning. If you let it stand for any length of time, there may be a little oil on the surface, which you can skim off. Add any juices given out when you slice the beef.

Thickened gravy: If you want to thicken the gravy slightly, add 2 teaspoons flour to the pan after cooking the vegetables, then add the wine and cook, stirring, for a couple of minutes until it thickens.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
4g
6%
Saturated Fat
2g
8%
Cholesterol
45mg
15%
Carbohydrate, by difference
11g
8%
Protein
16g
35%
Vitamin A, RAE
30µg
4%
Vitamin B-12
2µg
83%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
3mg
4%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
1µg
1%
Calcium, Ca
22mg
2%
Choline, total
41mg
10%
Fiber, total dietary
1g
4%
Fluoride, F
23µg
1%
Folate, total
8µg
2%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
22mg
7%
Niacin
3mg
21%
Phosphorus, P
133mg
19%
Selenium, Se
16µg
29%
Sodium, Na
52mg
3%
Water
178g
7%
Zinc, Zn
5mg
63%

Roast Beef Shopping Tip

Most cattle are fed a diet of grass until they are sent to a feedlot – where they are finished on corn. When possible, choose beef from cattle that are “100% grass fed” - it will be more expensive, but better for your health.

Roast Beef Cooking Tip

The method used to cook beef is dependent on the cut. Cuts that are more tender, like filet mignon, should be cooked for a relatively short amount of time over high heat by grilling or sautéing. While less tender cuts, like brisket and short ribs, should be cooked for a longer time with lower heat by braising or stewing.

Roast Beef Wine Pairing

Pinot noir, gamay, merlot, zinfandel, carménère, pinotage, or grenache with grilled, roasted, or other simply cooked chicken; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, pinot blanc, or chenin blanc with chicken in cream or light tomato sauce or with chicken crêpes or croquettes; sauvignon blanc or sémillon with fried chicken; viognier with spiced chicken dishes.