Preserving Tuna

Staff Writer
Preserving Tuna
Preserving Tuna
Colin Clark

Preserving Tuna

Growing up, I was indifferent to tuna in a can, but the first time I had canned tuna in Spain, I completely changed my tuna tune. The Spanish are fanatical about their canned seafood, and tuna is no exception. In recent years, high-quality Spanish tuna has become available in the United States; however, it is surprisingly easy to make your own when high-quality yellowfin is available. And as I’ve said earlier, we must be careful to choose the right tuna (i.e., not bluefin).

I like to fold preserved tuna with homemade all i oli and sliced cucumbers for a delicious tuna salad sandwich. Even a piece of preserved tuna on toast is great. Or toss it in a salad with cherry tomatoes, feta cheese, walnuts, and arugula.

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3
Servings
3397
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients
Makes
4 jars

Ingredients

  • 1 Pound kosher salt
  • 1 Pound sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon pimentón
  • 1 Pound freshest available yellowfin or bonito tuna
  • 4 Cups olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 4 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 8 guindilla peppers
  • Zest of 4 lemons, shaved with a vegetable peeler

Directions

Combine the salt, sugar, and pimentón in a bowl and add the tuna, covering thoroughly with the salt and sugar mix. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour to cure. Thoroughly rinse the tuna and pat dry.

Combine the olive oil, garlic, thyme, guindilla, and lemon zest in a large pot and heat over very
low heat to 125 degrees on a candy thermometer. Add the tuna and gently cook for 10 minutes, until the tuna is just cooked through but not dry.

 

Remove the fish to a plate lined with a paper towel and let both fish and oil cool.

 

Divide the fish among 4 small, sterilized canning jars with flip-top lids and top with the olive oil and herb cooking mixture. Cover the jars and process in boiling water for a minute to seal. The tuna will keep in the refrigerator for about 3 weeks.
 

Tuna Shopping Tip

Seafood shopping is quite easy in the general sense. Rule of thumb: if it smells fishy, don't buy. Fresh seafood should smell mild and more like the ocean and sea water rather than fish.

Tuna Cooking Tip

Looking for a quick mid-week dinner? Seafood is a safe bet. It's quick to cook and simple recipes can get dinner on the table in 20 minutes.

Tuna Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
290g
100%
Sugar
161g
N/A
Saturated Fat
40g
100%
Cholesterol
59mg
20%
Protein
41g
82%
Carbs
176g
59%
Vitamin A
149µg
17%
Vitamin B12
3µg
52%
Vitamin B6
2mg
100%
Vitamin C
298mg
100%
Vitamin D
3µg
1%
Vitamin E
44mg
100%
Vitamin K
198µg
100%
Calcium
92mg
9%
Fiber
9g
35%
Folate (food)
46µg
N/A
Folate equivalent (total)
46µg
11%
Iron
6mg
31%
Magnesium
102mg
25%
Monounsaturated
210g
N/A
Niacin (B3)
30mg
100%
Phosphorus
512mg
73%
Polyunsaturated
31g
N/A
Potassium
1415mg
40%
Riboflavin (B2)
0.4mg
20.9%
Sodium
2298mg
96%
Sugars, added
151g
N/A
Thiamin (B1)
0.4mg
26.9%
Zinc
1mg
8%

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