Pan-Seared Alaska Cod With Mussels in Tomato Broth

You’ll have a simply delicious, fresh, and flavorful dinner on the table in about 45 minutes with this dish
Pan Seared Alaska Cod with Mussels in Tomato Broth

Milagros Cruz

Alaska’s waters are home to over 95 percent of Pacific halibut and over 70 percent of the black cod harvested in the United States; Alaska cod accounts for 99 percent of the cod harvested in the U.S. If you can’t find fresh Alaska seafood, frozen filets are a great option available year round at retailers nationwide and easy to thaw or cook directly from frozen form.

This recipe starts off with a simple tomato broth made of fresh garlic, onions, chicken broth, whole peeled tomatoes, chorizo, and parsley. Add in the mussels and while those cook, sear the Alaska cod, and you’re done! You’ll have a simply delicious, fresh, and flavorful dinner on the table in about 45 minutes.

If you’re looking to make a pescatarian dish omit the chorizo and substitute the chicken broth for vegetable stock!

For more information on Alaska seafood, visit: www.wildalaskaseafood.com.

6
Servings
418
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the tomato broth:

  • 1 yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 6 Ounces chorizo, chopped
  • 7 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 Tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 Teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 28-ounce cans canned tomatoes (tomatoes roughly chopped)
  • 1 Cup chicken broth
  • 6 Pounds mussels, scrubbed and debearded
  • 6 Tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped, divided

For the Alaska cod:

  • 6 Alaska cod filets, skin off
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 1 Tablespoon garlic powder
  • Juice from 1/2 lemon
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • Garlic toast, for serving

Directions

For the tomato broth:

Finely chop the yellow onion and chorizo, and mince the garlic. Add olive oil to a large pot over medium high heat and add onions, chorizo, and garlic. Cook garlic, chorizo, and onions, stirring occasionally until tender and chorizo is browned about 5-7 minutes. Season the chorizo, onion, and garlic mixture with salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes.

Roughly chop the tomatoes from the two 28-ounce cans; add the liquid and chopped tomatoes to the pot and season with more salt and pepper. Add in chicken broth, stir, and bring to a boil. Reduce pot to low and let the tomato broth simmer for 25 minutes.

While the tomato broth is simmering, scrub and debeard the mussels. Discard any mussels that are already open or have broken shells.

When the tomato broth has 7 minutes left of cooking time, make the Alaska cod.

Once the tomato broth has simmered, and the fish fillets are done, add the mussels to the tomato broth and cook for about 3 minutes. Discard any mussels that have not opened.

Once mussels have cooked, stir in fresh parsley. 

For the Alaska cod:

Season the Alaska cod with salt, pepper, garlic powder, and juice from ½ lemon. Add one tablespoon of olive oil to a sauté pan. Sear Alaska cod for 3-4 minutes on each side.

To plate: Divide tomato broth and mussels into six equal bowl; top each with a fillet of Alaska cod, garnish with extra parsley, and serve with garlic toast if desired.

 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
24g
34%
Sugar
35g
39%
Saturated Fat
15g
63%
Cholesterol
26mg
9%
Carbohydrate, by difference
45g
35%
Protein
10g
22%
Vitamin A, RAE
122µg
17%
Vitamin B-12
1µg
42%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
30mg
40%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
258µg
100%
Calcium, Ca
48mg
5%
Choline, total
47mg
11%
Fiber, total dietary
6g
24%
Folate, total
38µg
10%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
46mg
14%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
3mg
21%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
111mg
16%
Selenium, Se
9µg
16%
Sodium, Na
503mg
34%
Water
462g
17%
Zinc, Zn
2mg
25%

Cod Shopping Tip

A fresh fish should not smell fishy nor have milky, opaque eyes; it should have bright red gills, firm flesh, and a tight anal cavity.

Cod Cooking Tip

Whole fish should be stored upright in ice in the refrigerator.

Cod Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.