Canned Tuna Open-Faced Sandwich

Canned Tuna Open-Faced Sandwich
Staff Writer
Canned Tuna Sandwich
Yasmin Fahr

Canned Tuna Sandwich

OK, maybe I actually used fancy oil-packed tuna for this recipe, but canned tuna works just as well. If you decide to buy tuna stored in water, then you'll probably want to add a tablespoon or two of oil to the recipe below. 

This open-faced sandwich is light, crunchy, and gets a mild hint of spice from the chile flakes. Feel free to top it with another piece of bread if you wish, but then make sure that both slices are thin so it doesn't overpower the main ingredients inside. 

Click here for 8 Sweet and Savory Sandwiches

2
Servings
13
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • One 7-ounce jar of oil-packed tuna
  • 1 Tablespoon chopped chives
  • 1 Tablespoon chopped scallions, white and green parts
  • Pinch of red chile flakes
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 4-5 grape tomatoes, sliced in half lengthwise
  • 2 pieces of Bibb lettuce
  • 2 thick slices Pugliese bread or other crusty bread
  • Cilantro leaves, torn, for garnish (optional)

Directions

In a small bowl, add the tuna and roughly break it apart with a fork. Add the chives, scallions, chile flakes, lime juice, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add the tomato slices and toss. Place a piece of lettuce on each slice of bread and top with the tuna mixture. Grate additional fresh pepper if desired and a few pieces of cilantro, if using, and serve. 

Nutritional Facts

Cholesterol
3mg
1%
Carbohydrate, by difference
1g
1%
Protein
2g
4%
Vitamin A, RAE
1µg
0%
Calcium, Ca
1mg
0%
Folate, total
1µg
0%
Magnesium, Mg
2mg
1%
Phosphorus, P
14mg
2%
Selenium, Se
1µg
2%
Sodium, Na
95mg
6%
Water
12g
0%

Canned Tuna Shopping Tip

While "chunk light" varieties may be cheaper, "solid white" varieties are higher quality and better tasting.

Canned Tuna Cooking Tip

For a quick and easy tuna salad, combine the tuna with mayonnaise and relish and sprinkle salt and pepper.

Canned Tuna Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.