Proenza Schouler SS15: A Strange Sportswear Collection That Almost Misses the Mark

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Proenza Schouler SS15: A Strange Sportswear Collection That Almost Misses the Mark

There are plenty of shows that we wouldn’t want to miss at New York Fashion Week, but one of the most highly anticipated runways of the season is always Proenza Schouler. For Spring 2015, Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough broke free of their golden streak and decided to play with textures, colors and fabrics that were a little strange, all things considered, but overall didn’t fail to please. Playing with sportswear, ‘80s silhouettes and elevated everyday attire, the collection is both chic and unexpected in a shoppable mix of strange hits and misses.

Proenza Schouler

Beginning with the idea of America sportswear, the Proenza boys started with basics and brought them up to Fashion Week standards with leather, crochet, knits and python prints. Laser-cut check patterns were popular throughout the collection, found in skirts, trims and shirts, while argyle was featured with a twist, mirrored through abstract knits and leather. An attempt to mix both lady-like silhouettes and sportswear caused the collection to fall a little flat, leaving a wearable, but ultimately dull collection—not what we’ve come to expect of Proenza Schouler.

Proenza Schouler

Color followed that of the previous season with muted creams, khaki, gray and black, but was spotted with electric blue and burnt reds that gave the collection some its best and worst moments. Blue, snakeskin motorcycle jackets were bold and of-the-moment on the runway, and will undoubtedly be seen on street style stars next season, while the orange-red, dual tone leather pants seem better suited for lovable villain Harley Quinn. The elastic-waist leather skirt we could live without (especially in that Halloween motif) and the oversized parkas are not doing the models any favors.

Proenza Schouler

But despite the few looks that were more costume than runway, there were a few outstanding pieces that carried the collection and made it a win. Fringe has been hitting the runway in the worst way and no one seems to be getting it right—until now. Pulling it down to an angle at the bottom of sleeveless dresses made fringe seem chic, which, to be honest, is something we never thought we’d say. It was left as an undone weave, falling from the garment organically and at all the right lengths, something Hernandez and McCollough excel at. Hopefully we see work that lives up to their name next season.

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