The Typical Vegan Diet Lacks Important Nutrients, a Study Says

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland claims that vegan diets lack key vitamins and can be detrimental to health
You may think you’re eating healthier by abstaining from meat and dairy, but are you really?

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You may think you’re eating healthier by abstaining from meat and dairy, but are you really?

Whether you become meat and dairy-free for moral, religious, or health reasons, veganism just may not be enough to sustain a healthy lifestyle, a new study says.

Scientists at the University of Finland claim that vegans lack key nutrients and vitamins on the whole, compared with their carnivorous counterparts, especially vitamins B12 and D. In addition, non-vegans and vegetarians consumed more protein and significantly more fat on a daily basis than vegans, according to the study.

The study — although comprehensive — only studied the dietary habits of 22 vegans and 19 non-vegans for three days, and concluded that it’s essential for those who do not eat meat or dairy to take multiple supplements to ensure that they are not under or malnourished.

"This study corroborates the view that nutritional guidance is important to vegans and that vegan diets should be regularly supplemented with key nutrients," wrote the authors. "More emphasis should be placed on vitamin D and iodine to ensure sufficient intakes."

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