KIND Wants the FDA to Redefine Health Standards So It Can Legally Label Its Bars Healthy

After the FDA asked KIND to remove ‘healthy’ from its packaging, the company wants to change standards
Nuts, granola, and natural sugars… would you consider that a properly balanced breakfast?

KIND Bars

Nuts, granola, and natural sugars… would you consider that a properly balanced breakfast?

The legal definition of healthy just may come down to the strong requests of a granola bar company. KIND, known for its bars with naturally sweet fruit and nut ingredients, was asked by the FDA in April to stop labeling its bars as healthy.

Why? The FDA has certain standards for the definition of healthy and KIND bars, which usually contain honey, chocolate, and sugary dried fruits, did not make the grade. The FDA at the time had downgraded KIND bars because they contain 1.5 to four grams of saturated fat more than is healthy for you.

Now KIND is fighting back and has petitioned the United States government to change the legal definition of healthy “to meet current scientific and medical standards.”

KIND has argued that its bars, which contain nutrient-rich foods, namely, plenty of nuts, should be considered healthy because they contain saturated fats which have been proven to be “part of a balanced diet” along with other good fats like avocado, salmon, and olive oil.

"[W]e learned that the regulations needed to be updated as they are inconsistent with the dietary guidelines and current nutrition science," founder and CEO Daniel Lubetzky told CNNMoney.

The FDA has not yet responded to KIND’s request.

Related Links
DIY: KIND BarsCashew & Ginger Spice KIND Bar: Too Good to be Food?Battle Royale: Luna vs. Quest vs. Kind BarsKind Bars Don’t Deserve ‘Healthy’ Label, FDA SaysDIY Granola Bars