Fast-Food Workers Protest Trump’s Labor Secretary Pick

Hundreds of fast-food workers are gathering to protest the appointment of new Labor Secretary Andy Puzder
Andy Puzder has not exactly been a popular choice amongst workers.

Fight for 15

Andy Puzder has not exactly been a popular choice amongst workers.

The nomination of Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. CEO Andy Puzder as Secretary of Labor has been a contentious one. Democrats have called Puzder “anti-labor” and he presumably will face a long series of questions and debates at his Senate confirmation hearing on Thursday.

In the days leading up to the hearing, fast-food workers across the nation have protested his potential appointment by President Trump. Workers and Congressional Democraticsalike have expressed concern over issues of wage theft, discrimination, and sexual harassment at Pudzer’s CKE restaurant chains, according to data extrapolated by the Century Foundation.

Workers, led by the “Fight for $15” group, gathered this week outside Carl’s Jr and Hardee’s headquarters in Anaheim, California, as well as at store locations in St. Louis, Austin, St. Paul, and other cities around the nation, according to Democracy Now.  Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass) has rallied around protestors, and sent a “blistering letter” to Puzder. The 28-page note accused him of holding a “sneering contempt for the workers in your stores and a vehement opposition to the laws you will be charged with enforcing."

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Puzder’s confirmation hearing has been delayed four times due to ethics concerns. Puzder has stated that he would resign as CEO of CKE restaurants and would sell his holdings in other companies and investments within 90 days of being appointed Labor Secretary, according to the Los Angeles Times.