Drinking Coffee May Reduce Your Risk of a Heart Attack

Staff Writer
Drinking Coffee May Reduce Your Risk of a Heart Attack
Drinking Coffee May Reduce Your Risk of a Heart Attack
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Those caffeine jitters seems like they’d mess with your heart, but they could actually be doing the opposite. 

Coffee gets a bad rep: it stains your teeth, gets you addicted to caffeine, and “stunts your growth.” But new research says that your Starbucks addiction could actually be helping your body.

 A new study published in the British Medical Journal’s publication Heart suggests that consuming three to five cups of coffee per day is linked to a lower risk of coronary artery buildup. This buildup can lead to blockages, and eventually, serious heart problems.

Researchers at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital in Seoul, South Korea examined over 25,000 male and female employees for a two-year study examining their coffee drinking habits. Findings revealed that deposits of coronary artery calcium, which leads to build-up later on, were lowest in the participants who drank three to five cups of coffee daily. The coronary arteries are the vessels that bring oxygenated blood to the heart muscle itself.

Researchers would not go as far as recommending people drink coffee to prevent heart attacks.

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