Alternative Sweeteners from 5 Ways to Make Home-Made Doughnuts Slideshow

5 Ways to Make Home-Made Doughnuts Slideshow

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Alternative Sweeteners

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Alternative Sweeteners

Sugar helps with the chemical composition of many recipes, but that doesn’t mean some can’t be taken out and replaced with another form of sweetener. Try experimenting with zero-calorie sugar alternatives like stevia, monk fruit, or agave. This hack can work for the frosting as well.

This healthy pumpkin spice doughnut recipe only uses almond milk, yogurt, and maple syrup to make its delicate frosting.  

Baked Not Fried

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Baked Not Fried

When making doughnuts as home, it’s exponentially healthier to bake them. Baking not only avoids a pan full of scalding oil, but it also saves your body from a ton of calories. You can bake any doughnut, even if the recipe calls for it to be fried. When a doughnut is prepared in the oven, it develops a tender, cake-like consistency. An added benefit is that your hands won’t be covered in greasy oil.

A baked doughnut is also a terrific canvas to experiment with exotic flavors. Try making a batch of baked currant nutmeg doughnuts or these easy baked doughnuts for your next party.

Go Mini

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Go Mini

Do you really need to eat a giant doughnut? Help control your intake by making your doughnuts mini. They look cute, fit in the palm of your hand, and you can eat it fast enough so nobody sees (but we’re not judging). Here’s a great recipe for mini baked chocolate chip doughnuts.

Protein Laced

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Protein Laced

Doughnuts don’t have to be empty calories. In order to pack some extra punch into your next doughnut recipe, try adding a few tablespoons of your favorite flavored protein powder.  The addition of protein powder won’t alter the taste, but will add satiating protein, elevating your doughnut from a sweet snack to a sweet supplement. 

Whole Grain or Gluten-Free Flour Blends

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Whole Grain or Gluten-Free Flour Blends

Now that we’ve eliminated the oil and sugar, it’s time to tackle the flour. All-purpose flour might look pretty and pure, but it’s a nightmare for your waistline. Substituting a heartier whole wheat or gluten- free flour can improve the fiber content of the doughnut, meaning you will stay full longer.

Here’s a great recipe for gluten-free baked blueberry doughnuts

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Whole Grain Flour

5 Ways to Make Home-Made Doughnuts Slideshow