World’s First 3-D Candy Printer Coming to a Kitchen Near You

Move over, Mr. Wonka!
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With ChefJet's 3-D printer, the possibilities are endless.

The seemingly limitless world of 3-D printing has given the world some of the most mind-blowing technological advances we’ve ever known —  printable organs composed of living tissue, prosthetic limbs inspired by Internet tutorials,  printable handguns, and endless applications to come. The wonders never cease! But what's perhaps most exciting to us here at The Daily Meal is the advent of printable candy. With an expected release date sometime in late 2014, the ChefJet and ChefJet Pro printers from 3D Systems are supposedly the world’s first dedicated 3-D food printers, though a few independent designers have dabbled in printed foods, like  Hans Fouche, who creates custom chocolates in South Africa.

However, the ChefJet is the first 3-D printer created specifically to print food, like an incredibly high-tech update to the Easy Bake ovens of our childhoods. A combination of sugar and water creates a "sugar frosting" that, according to The Verge, almost exactly replicates the flavor of the marshmallows in a box of Lucky Charms. Tyler Gold, a writer for the publication, got to experience the incredible confectionary feat when the ChefJet printers were unveiled at the 2014 International CES in Las Vegas, which runs Jan. 7 through Jan. 10.

The printers come with a copy of The Digital Cookbook, and candy flavors so far include chocolate, vanilla, sour apple, cherry, watermelon, and mint. Although the ChefJet only prints in black and white, the Pro version is able to create candy in an assortment of colors. Candies are also printed in a variety of complex shapes, including highly customizable wedding cake toppers. According to Liz von Hasseln, the company’s creative director, food and 3-D printing are made for each other. "Food is an incredible platform for creativity, experimentation, and celebration and we are thrilled to place these powerful 3-D printers in bakers and chefs’ kitchens. We invite leading pastry chefs, restaurateurs, and event planners to join us in bringing 3-D printing into the kitchen."

 
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