Brazil: Pastel from Drunk Munchies Around the World (Slideshow)

Drunk Munchies Around the World (Slideshow)

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Brazil: Pastel

Served with a sweet or savory filling, these fried stall snacks are a late-night staple in Brazil. Said to have originated as a South American adaptation of fried wontons introduced by Japanese immigrants, the present-day pastel can include anything from ground meat and mozzarella or heart of palm and cream cheese, to jam, chocolate, or banana for those with a sweeter tooth.

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Scotland and Northern England: Chips & Gravy

A great divide exists when it comes to chips (French fries) in the United Kingdom. As far as Southern Britons are concerned, the way to eat fries is with salt and/or vinegar, whereas in the North and in Scotland late-night hunger is satisfied only with gravy, or “chippie sauce.” The British civil conflict over proper chip consumption doesn’t end there: London’s most popular pick is mayonnaise, Wales prefers curry, and all around HP sauce (or brown sauce) is a popular addition. 

Scotland and Northern England: Chips & Gravy

A great divide exists when it comes to chips (French fries) in the United Kingdom. As far as Southern Britons are concerned, the way to eat fries is with salt and/or vinegar, whereas in the North and in Scotland late-night hunger is satisfied only with gravy, or “chippie sauce.” The British civil conflict over proper chip consumption doesn’t end there: London’s most popular pick is mayonnaise, Wales prefers curry, and all around HP sauce (or brown sauce) is a popular addition. 

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Hungary: Làngos

A deep-fried flat bread, làngos is simple enough to cater to every preference, with common add-ins including cheese, sour cream, sausage, ham, jam or confectioner’s (powdered) sugar. A Hungarian (and Austrian) fast-food staple, locals say that street vendors often offer up the best version.

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Sweden: Kebab Pizza

Kebab is the universally glorified drunk food, but the ever-innovative Swedes have taken the Turkish phenomenon a step further and slapped it on top of pizza. Statistically the most popular pizza topping in Sweden (especially among the late-night orders), the typical recipe calls for tomato sauce, cheese, onion, fefferoni peppers, kebab meat and, of course, kebab sauce. The best part? You can order it so that the kebab pizza is folded prior to baking to resemble a Viking ship. 

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China: Shao Kao

The Chinese translation for barbecue, shao kao stalls line the busy streets of Chinese cities offering out flame-grilled skewered meats and vegetables heavily seasoned with spices like cumin or five-spice powder. The ultimate grab-and-go snack for the way home. 

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Germany: Currywurst

Walk down the late-night streets of any German city and you can’t miss the wafting smell of fried sausage, an absolutely decadent aroma for the hungry inebriated. It’s no wonder people flock to the stalls doling out greasy, freshly-fried meats. Most popular of all? Currywurst, the steamed-then-fried pork sausage covered in ketchup mixed up with curry and other spices. Many Germans also swear by the salty rollmops, a pickled herring fillet rolled around another pickled food like cucumber or sauerkraut, as a hangover-averter. Even more will tell you to keep drinking beer, provincially known as having a “counter beer.”   

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Spain: Churros con Chocolate

With its cuisine heavily focused on savory dishes of fish or meat and olive oil, cheeses and salted snacks, the Spanish sweet tooth comes out in full force at night. This fried-dough pastry is decadent enough by itself, but the late-night stalls serve it up with a cup of hot chocolate to dip it in — and not the hot cocoa that comes in powder form, but real, melted chocolate. 

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The Netherlands: Kapsalon

An absolutely indulgent dish, Kapsalon is a mish-mash of fries topped with shawarma meat grilled with a layer of Gouda cheese, covered in salad greens and served with garlic sauce and sambal. Ticking it at roughly 1800 delicious calories per serving, it’s a hard drunk meal to top in terms of utter satisfaction.  

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South Africa: Boerie Roll

The cultural makeup of South Africa is distinctly diverse, so it stands to reason its food would follow suit. The Boerie Roll is the de facto national staple, a type of sausage containing beef and sometimes lamb and/or pork. Samosas are also wildly popular, as are chip and cheese rotis, a friend flatbread stuffed burrito-style with, of course, French fries and cheese. 

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Canada: Poutine

Canadians are typically big travelers, and one of the most common grievances encountered is their inability to find good poutine when outside of Canada. This wildly popular French fry-based dish is a drunk eater’s dream. In its most basic form, poutine fries are covered in cheese curds and brown gravy, but literally dozens and dozens of varieties are available, ranging from anything like bacon-topped to barbecue pulled pork to chorizo and queso fresco

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Australia: Meat Pies

An iconic snack in both Australia and New Zealand, this minced-meat-stuffed snack is popular for a quick pre-bedtime bite. Often including mushrooms, onions, gravy, and other fillings, plenty of places sell ready-to-eat meat pies at small vendors including Pie Face, but others just opt for heating up the convenience store variety. 

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The Philippines: Sisig

Famous for strange delicacies like the duck embryo balut, The Philippines is known for catering to a bit of a more eccentric palate. It comes as no surprise that the archipelago’s go-to after a boozy binge is a dish made from parts of pig’s head and liver, then seasoned with calamansi, an Asian citrus fruit, and chili peppers. If your mood doesn’t fancy the traditional recipe, sisig also can be made with ox brains, or for the less adventurous, eggs, chicken, or tuna. 

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Korea: Tteokbokki

Simple and spicy, this massively popular Korean snack can be found bubbling in huge vats from street vendors nationwide. Made from chewy rice cakes, fish cakes, and a red pepper (gochujang) sauce of varying levels of spice, a big cup of tteobokki (or sometimes found skewered and lightly grilled) settles that soju in your stomach after a late night. An honorable mention: kimbap, or seaweed-wrapped rolls stuffed with rice, vegetables, sometimes meat or fish, and lightly topped with a spread of sesame oil.

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The Thai Islands: 7-Eleven Toasties

Thailand has a lot to offer when it comes to satisfying late night hunger, like street cart pad Thai or spring rolls, but down in the islands the streets fill up with the aroma of grilling toasties pouring out of 7-Elevens. Ham and cheese is the usual go-to, but there are varieties like pizza and hot dog as well. And it’s only $1!   

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New York City: 99-cent Pizza

There is not much food more quintessentially New York than a slice of pizza. Horrifyingly greasy but undeniably satisfying, wandering down the avenues of New York after hours just isn’t complete without cradling an oil-soaked paper plate in one hand, half-eaten slice folded over in the other — and when you’re less than sober, a bargain slice holds more sway than a gourmet pie. 

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Los Angeles: Tacos

L.A.’s answer to New York’s pizza passion is its taco trucks. With trucks ranging from the most basic, straightforward Mexican fare to ultra-gourmet ones popping up almost weekly (Korean pork rib tacos, anyone?), the L.A. late-night taco truck scene is ever-evolving. 

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Global: Kebab

While every country has its definitive cuisine and the drunk munchies that fit comfortably within those boundaries, unequivocally the most universal late night go-to is doner kebab. While many countries have their own slight variations, the Turkish dish is nearly globally available and always dependable to satisfy any palate’s late night cravings. 

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Drunk Munchies Around the World (Slideshow)

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