drink garnish coronavirus
Annie Otzen/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Drinks Post-Coronavirus Should Be Served Without Fruit Garnish, According to Survey

Cutting one drink element can eliminate additional risk
drink garnish coronavirus
Annie Otzen/DigitalVision via Getty Images

When you order a vodka sprite or gin and tonic, you probably expect it to come with a lime wedge. The same goes for a slice of a pineapple with a piña colada, cherries in a shirley temple and a lemon slice for water or a Diet Coke. Fruit garnishes are a part of drink culture, but after the coronavirus outbreak, establiments might opt to have them served upon request only, on the side or not at all.

Popular Coronavirus Quarantine Cocktails By State

According to a new study by market research company Dataessential, 46% of people surveyed said they want their drinks garnished upon request only. This answer was most prominent among baby boomers.

A quarter of respondents want their garnish served on the side, and 29% would rather skip it altogether. Why? Because fruit garnishes have had a reputation for being a hidden source of bacteria long before coronavirus.

Several studies have found lemon wedges in drinks can be contaminated with microorganisms that cause illness and disease. These germs can come from people handling them who don't wash their hands well or from tools used to cut or serve them that are not properly cleaned.

Related

All things considered, you might want to ask for your garnish on the side or skip it altogether the next time you step out for a drink. Drink garnishes are just one of diners' many concerns about the restaurant experience after coronavirus.