Sake sangria and red wine sangria
Forget Saketinis, there’s another fruit and sake combination you should consider mixing for your next dinner party: Sake Sangria. Easy to prepare and perfect for the summer season, the key to this recipe is the game-changing Crop Organic Cucumber Flavored Vodka. Serve the drink on its own, or better yet, offer it in tandem with the No-Soak Red Wine Sangria.
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Best Martini Recipes
Recipes from Crystal Springs in New Jersey.
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Sake-Steamed Clams
Just six ingredients and 15 minutes out of a busy day are all that's needed to whip up this quick lunch or dinner. These sake-steamed clams are a snap to make and delicious — and the convivial effects of sake go without saying. Fresh ginger and red chile pepper add a little extra kick.
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This drink is gluten free and contains no sulfites, tannins or preservatives — you can create delicious coladas and margaritas all weekend long without a headache to hold you back!  This is one great skinny cocktail to sip all summer long, guilt-free! Read more about the Best Cocktails for Memorial Day. 
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Clams Steamed in Sake with Soy and Pine Nuts
In recent years, you may have read about umami, the mysterious fifth taste. If you're still having a hard time recognizing it, though, I'm going to take you right to the source. The Japanese were the first to identify this taste in dashi — the broth that is so central to their cuisine. It is made with kombu (a form of seaweed or kelp), dried bonito flakes, and water. I spike mine with sake, and the rest of the recipe carries home the Asian theme with tofu and tamari. The finished dish is a mix of tastes and textures that I think of as Japanese clams casino. When you eat it, remember that in Japanese, umami means "deliciousness." — Franklin Becker, Good Fat Cooking
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It's National Sake Day, and no one knows how to better celebrate than New York City's Koi Bryant Park and SoHo restaurants. Not only does the restaurant specialize in sake cocktails, like the Rockin' Cucumber made with Rock sake and vodka, Koi has its own exclusive sake on tap. Brewed by the Kamikokoro Brewery in the Okayama prefuncture (an area that's known for producing Japan's top sakes), the fragrant Koi Sake's rice has been polished to 50 percent, ensuring the purest quality possible. Try the Rockin' Cucumber next time you're in, or make your own at home. 
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The Japanese take on a tiki cocktail punch may no longer be at New York City’s HARU sushi restaurant, but it’s reportedly adored so much by fans that many have attempted to recreated it at home for a Friday night — and failed miserably. Fortunately, you don’t need to suffer the blues this weekend when you could be heating things up with this popular potent punch including bourbon, sake, and more liquor. No wonder the Scorpion Punch has such a mean bite. Click back for more tiki cocktails. 
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Kasai Sour
This simple cocktail is sweetened with pineapple juice and yuzu juice. Garnish it all with a sprinkle of freshly grated cinnamon.Click here for more cocktail recipes.
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By
Another drink by Robert E. Wilkes, this cocktail is another twist on the classic mojito, this time substituting Japanese shiso leaves for the mint, sweet sake (mansaku no hana) for the rum, and using Sprite instead of club soda. Nihongo is the Japanese word for, well, "Japanese." I created this drink for a Teppanyaki restaurant in Tokyo and its very refreshing flavor profile is appreciated by locals and foreigners alike. This article was originally published on bevvy.com.
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Sky Room's Sakred Land Cocktail
Now that you know how how quinoa is changing the spirits and vodka game, find out how to use FAIR Vodka in your home bar. From mixologists Marcus Wood and Thierry Pomies at New York City's Sky Room, the Sakred Land cocktail is as innovative as the vodka itself. "Quinoa vodka! Originally cultivated by the Incas in the 13th century, it is now regarded as a super food in the western world," Wood said. "Our use of it is a new approach to cocktails with a nutritional value, and we utilize it alongside our infusion of superfruits and anti-oxidants.” 
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Evan Sung
Sometimes another language’s name for a dish makes it sound especially exotic and exciting. Take crudités for example. Much more appealing than “raw vegetables,” right? Shioyaki, too, sounds exotic and special, and the dish certainly tastes extraordinary—crisp-skinned and flavor-packed. What could be the secret? Well, it’s basically fish, seasoned with salt, and broiled. That’s it!The magic is in the details. Buy the best salmon you can lay your hands on (wild salmon delivers great flavor and texture) and ask your fishmonger (or beg, if you have to) for center-cut fillets with a strip of fatty belly attached. Then salt the fish an hour before you plan to cook, so the salt has a chance to penetrate the fish, not just season the exterior. Leftovers make a great filling for Onigiri (rice balls), if you can leave fish this good uneaten.Recipe excerpted with permission from Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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nitsuki
Even my mother made a pretty good nitsuke— that’s how easy this dish is to cook. A familiar mixture of dashi, sake, mirin, and soy sauce infuses the fish with its flavor and turns a modest collection of ingredients into something that’s exciting and comforting at once. Because it takes only a little extra effort and adds a ton of flavor, I like to break with tradition and reduce the cooking liquid into a more intensely flavorful sauce.Recipe excerpted with permission from Mastering the Art of Japanese Home Cooking by Masaharu Morimoto. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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