Lamb Burger with Tzatziki
Themed burgers can be dangerous. Use too many gimmicks, make things too complicated, and you run the risk of being all concept. It's one of the things I most admire about Chef Scott Smith at RUB BBQ in New York, who does a different themed burger every week. Scott's burgers are always playful and within the idea he's doing, but they always work.I keep this in mind anytime I try something overly complicated or themed — making sure that the dish works not just within the theme but on the palate. So it was with this Greek-themed lamb burger with tzatziki. Technically pita probably would have been the component to finish this theme, but it's hard to find fantastic pita, and pita with a burger... well, kinda doesn't feel like a burger anymore — feels like a gimmick.So with this Greek-themed lamb burger, the flavors are there, with a couple themed touches, but when it comes down to it, it's still a burger. A spicy, tangy, salty, juicy, wet burger. You won't be disappointed.
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Lamb burgers
These pan-Mediterranean lamb burgers are spicy and fragrant. If you have a nice butcher, get him to grind the lamb for you. I like to use ground shoulder for these burgers. See all eggplant recipes.
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Grilled Lamb Burgers
Whipped feta and grilled tomatoes may just be our favorite-ever additions to a juicy lamb burger.This recipe is courtesy of Not Without Salt.
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Lamb Burger Recipe
Lamb is more expensive than other types of ground meat but take one bite of these juicy burgers and you’ll see why. We don’t add much to the ground meat — just some onion, garlic, and spices — so that the flavor of the lamb can shine. Skip the cheese on these burgers and opt for a flavorful yogurt-based sauce instead.
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With truffles and a fried egg where do you go wrong? Nowhere. That's where. 
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Try to recreate this signature dish at home!
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Fried Kibbe
From Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking. Copyright ©2015 by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook. Used by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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The Zahav Lamb Shoulder
One night in 2006, as the executive chef of Marigold Kitchen, I was preparing a dinner at the James Beard House in New York. By the time we finished up, our crew was hungry and exhausted. We rolled into Momofuku Ssäm Bar around midnight, and several minutes later were presented with an entire slow-cooked pork shoulder, crackling on the outside and soft and juicy on the inside. With the familiarity of a kitchen team that had just worked a 14-hour shift, we devoured the whole thing.The Zahav Lamb Shoulder was born that night on the drive home. It was also possibly responsible for keeping me from falling asleep at the wheel. Next to our hummus, this is the dish that put Zahav on the map. We brine a whole lamb shoulder and smoke it over hardwood for a couple of hours. Then we braise it in pomegranate molasses until the meat is tender enough to eat with a spoon. Finally, the lamb shoulder is finished in a hot oven to crisp up the exterior. This dish is the best of all possible worlds — smoky and crispy, soft and tender, sweet and savory — and it’s a celebration all by itself. The use of pomegranate in this dish (and the crispy rice we serve with it) is very Persian, which is a cuisine with tradition so rich it always makes me think of palaces and royal banquets. The chickpeas recall the humble chamin, a traditional Sabbath stew that’s slow-baked overnight.Chickpeas, the underrated star of this dish, recall the humble chamin, a traditional Sabbath stew that’s slow-baked overnight. During the long braise, the lamb bones create a natural stock that is absorbed by the chickpeas, creating the richest, creamiest peas you’ve ever tasted. I’ve even made hummus with these chickpeas — totally decadent!Preparing the lamb shoulder is a two- or three-day process and thus requires some advance planning. We go through about sixty shoulders a week at the restaurant, and it’s still not enough. If you’ve ever been disappointed at Zahav, chances are it’s because we didn’t have a lamb shoulder for you. Now, you can make it for yourself.We smoke our lamb shoulders at Percy Street Barbecue. If you have a smoker, feel free to smoke the lamb. Or just roast the shoulder as the recipe indicates.From Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking, ©2015 by Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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Smoky Lamb Burgers with Mint-Chile Pickled Cucumbers
The recipe for these smoky lamb burgers came out of wanting to create a kicked-up burger that was no-fuss and would taste delicious with an ice-cold beer... I have two secret ingredients in this burger that give it that smoky, peppery edge. The first is black cardamom. The flavor is a bit lighter than green cardamom — earthier and with a woodsy smokiness. Black cardamom is used throughout North and East African cooking, in South Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine, and even in Sichuan cooking. But, don’t worry if you only have the green kind. It works beautifully here as well because there is still the second secret ingredient: pimentón de la Vera. If you’ve never used it before, this dish is a great intro — it’s smoked paprika and is a key ingredient in Spanish cooking. Both of these spices meld together here and bring out what’s best about lamb. Now, I’m a burger-with-pickles kind of gal, so I had to do a super quick pickle (ready in an hour!) to go with these. Thinly sliced cucumbers get quick-pickled with Thai green chiles, some fresh mint, garlic, and thinly sliced shallots. The shallots pickle, too, so I use both along with some fresh chopped mint and a nice piece of butter lettuce to top this burger.  These burgers are not for the faint of heart — they are big and bold! Feel free to turn this recipe into sliders or more modestly sized patties if you so desire. Enjoy! Click here to see 7 Must-Have Spices.
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Kefi Lamb Burger
Take a trip to the Mediterranean with this Greek-inspired lamb burger. A combination of dried parsley, oregano, and dill lends pleasant herbal flavors to the lamb patties, and a well-dressed salad with feta tops the patty.See all burger recipes.Click here to see Chefs' Favorite Burger Recipes.
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