Solerno
When it comes to hosting family-friendly holiday parties, few think of offering alcoholic and non-alcoholic variations of the same drink. We developed this blood-orange flavored soda with children, and those who don't imbibe, in mind.Inspired by the fresh flavors and vibrant colors of blood oranges, which appear in markets just before Christmas, and the unique shape of the red glass bottles of Solerno, this cocktail is simple to make, while the slightly-sweet citrus flavor is both refreshing and satisfying.Solerno is a clear Sicilian blood orange liqueur, made from whole blood orange fruit and essential oils. The bottle is a deep red, like the flesh of a blood orange, and takes on a unique design — the bottom features a punt (the indent on wine bottles) that resembles an orange juice strainer. Just looking at the bottle may make you thirsty for a cocktail.While the recipe below is for an adult version, you can leave out the liqueur for a kid-friendly blood orange soda. No one will know the difference.
View Recipe
5
I’ve made this recipe for years, it is so good! I’ve also taught it for years, even at the Culinary Institute of America to chefs there, and it just blew their minds. This salsa is great with grilled shrimp to serve for Cinco de Mayo. Skewer the shrimp, cook it on the grill, and serve with the salsa (you just might need to add more key lime juice to it).
View Recipe
5
Tagliatelle with Citrus Sauce
Tagliatelle is a type of flat pasta, similar but thinner than fettuccine. Citrus brightens up a rich cream sauce for a simple, hearty meal. Recipe courtesy of Chef Alessandro Gargani.
View Recipe
4.5
Citrus
Chef Gresh uses this flavor-infused charcoal when grilling to add another dimension to the food. Try it at home with this Grilled Halibut recipe. Click here to see Secrets for Better Griling.
View Recipe
4
Ginger Citrus Mulled Cider
Honey, lemons, ginger root, and oranges. This mulled cider recipe has it all, making it perfect to serve at a wide variety of fall parties.This recipe is courtesy of pillsbury.com.
View Recipe
4
Citrus
This bright and healthy dish is served with asparagus, endive, olives, and thyme. Use this clever way of adding citrus notes to charcoal to get the full effect of chef Gresh’s recipe. Check out how to make Citrus Charcoal here. Click here for more grilling tips from chef Gresh.  
View Recipe
4
While steeped in history, hot cross buns are fun to give a new and innovative twist to. This recipe, created by Jorj Morgan, gives them a citrusy bite, with orange zest and an orange-infused icing. 
View Recipe
4
Our version is decidedly less healthful than the original Girl Scouts version, which packs whole grains, real fruit, and no artifical flavors or colors. But it's defeinitely just as tasty and filled with bright cranberry and zesty citrus flavors. Read more about Drinks That Taste Just Like Girl Scout Cookies.
View Recipe
4
Ruby Citrus Sparkler
For your next brunch, raise a glass that's fizzy, not boozy. This refreshing drink is friendly for both kids and adults.This recipe is courtesy of Ocean Spray.
View Recipe
3.25
  The bratwurst in this recipe gets two cooking treatments. First, it’s simmered in a fragrant braising liquid made of fresh orange and lemon juice and Blue Moon’s Sunshine Citrus Blonde beer, and then it’s finished on the grill to give it a nice, flavorful char. 
View Recipe
3.21212
Pop's Citrus Salad.
My father is a man of infinite patience. Believe me, I know — I tried his. And while there aren't many recipes that make up his culinary repertoire (rotelli with ricotta and tomato sauce was actually a pretty satisfying classic), the one he's most known for is the quintessential demonstration of that patience — citrus salad. Walk into the kitchen on a weekend during the winter, and there he'd be, sitting at the table next to two boxes of grapefruits and oranges that my grandfather had sent from Florida, peeling each piece of fruit with a paring knife, the long peel most times hanging down to the floor in one long piece like some crazy citrus curlicue pig tails. Not only would he often cut off the peel in one piece time and again, he'd then somehow perfectly divide each orange and grapefruit segment, keeping them virtually all intact. And when he was done, there would be several containers of orange and grapefruit salad sitting in the fridge, each one half filled with the delicious juice that would form when the two fruits mixed. It's really such a simple fruit salad. Almost equal parts grapefruit and orange, but usually a bit more grapefruit. Tart, sweet segments bursting in your mouth together unlike how you ever really eat either fruit. No bitterness from the pith! And cold! This treat requires nothing else. No sugar, nothing. Sure you could add a touch of mint, but you really don't need it. In the summer it's a refreshing treat, and in the winter it reminds you of warmer times. For years, I reaped the benefits of his patient work without trying my own hand at it. So in the past few years, I've taken a stab at it myself. Now it's not like I don't have any patience, or am without knife skills. But no matter how many times I try, I just can't get all the segments to be as perfect as he does. So recently, I asked him about his philosophy and technique. "I've actuallly stopped peeling with the paring knife — it actually tends to remove more of the fruit and it takes too much time, but you know, I've had quite a bit of time to practice this." He's right. A few decades, in fact. So to try to accelerate the process and introduce my own touch to the salad's flavor, I've added pomelo to the grapefruit and orange, which is much easier to segment. Funny for how long it takes to make, how quickly it disappears. Click here to see more Sweet and Tangy Citrus recipes.
View Recipe
3
Don't just boil your carrots for your next dinner party; glaze them. This recipe uses honey, butter, and an orange peel to infuse the carrots with a bright and rich flavor. 
View Recipe
3