Starbucks to Buy Its First Coffee Farm

The Costa Rican farm will also research new technologies to help sustain coffee beans and farmers
Staff Writer

Wikimedia/ dirkvdMN

Starbucks just bought a coffee farm in Costa Rica.

No, it's not where Frappuccinos grow on trees: Starbucks has invested in a nearly 600-acre coffee farm that will be the center of research and development for coffee beans, and support for farmers worldwide. 

According to the Seattle Times, Starbucks has big plans to convert the farm into a research center for coffee beans, but has an even loftier goal — to ethically source all of its beans by 2015. By expanding its Coffee and Farming Equity practices (C.A.F.E.) and turning the farm to a support center (much like similar ones in Rwanda, Colombia, and other countries), Starbucks says it will lead the way to "ensure coffee quality while promoting social, environmental, and economic standards." Said CEO Howard Schultz in a statement, "This investment, and the cumulative impact it will have when combined with programs we have put into place over the last 40 years, will support the resiliency of coffee farmers and their families as well as the 1 million people that represent our collective coffee supply chain."

Also exciting news for Starbucks junkies — Schulzt also hinted that the new farm could be used to experiment with new varietals of coffee beans. So your Hazelnut Macchiatos (or any other drink) may be made with some brand-new coffee beans in the future. 

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