Around the World in 80 Desserts

Discover the most scrumptious sweet treats savored across the globe

Flickr / jamieanne
Alfajores are a popular cookie in Argentina.

From crumbly cakes like sfouf from Lebanon to tasty milk tarts from South Africa, sweet treats served at the end of a meal are the incentive for kids to eat their vegetables, the Achilles’ heel for most dieters, and the go-to fix for those with sugar addictions.

See Around the World in 80 Desserts Slideshow

So The Daily Meal has gone around the world in 80 desserts to delve into the different variations of delicious dessert delights across the globe, and tell you where to try them. For travelers craving something sweet, Around the World in 80 Desserts is a gastronomic guide through the sugars, syrups, and spices of the world's scrumptious signature treats.

We've covered six continents’ worth of cakes, cookies, and custards heavenly enough to make any diner loosen his or her belt and satisfy any sweet tooth.

Get the inside scoop on the history of American apple pie, New Zealand's favorite ice cream flavor, and where in the world soup is on the dessert menu. Savor the flavors of nutty phyllo pastries in Turkey and rich gooey puddings in Great Britain.

Whatever dish captivates you, these mouthwatering desserts promise to submerge your taste buds in a candied and caramelized culinary wonderland sure to induce a saccharine-sweet delirium.

Check out The Daily Meal’s Around the World in 80 Desserts Pinterest board and repin your favorite desserts from around the world using #80Desserts on Pinterest and Twitter. While you’re there, tell us where you have tried the best desserts in the world. Have we left any of your favorites off the list? Tell us in the comments section below.

Clare Sheehan is a Junior Writer at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @clare_sheehan.


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8 Comments

tdm-35-icon.png

Pastaies De Nata are served in Macau but they originated from (and pretty much are the national dessert of) Portugal. To attribute them to Macau in this article is misleading. In fact the Iberian peninsula was pretty much ignored except for Flan from Spain.

tdm-35-icon.png

Pastaies De Nata are served in Macau but they originated from (and pretty much are the national dessert of) Portugal. To attribute them to Macau in this article is misleading. In fact the Iberian peninsula was pretty much ignored except for Flan from Spain.

tdm-35-icon.png

I would like to correct your picture for the Kueh Bangkit from Malaysia. That's actually a Ang Koo Kueh, which is soft and made of glutinous rice flour with mung beans filling. The Kueh Bangkit you mentioned are white and looked more like cookies.

tdm-35-icon.png

I would like to correct your picture for the Kueh Bangkit from Malaysia. That's actually a Ang Koo Kueh, which is soft and made of glutinous rice flour with mung beans filling. The Kueh Bangkit you mentioned are white and looked more like cookies.

liselotz's picture

Great series! Very interesting to see desserts from all over the world.

I do wonder, though, at some of the pictures. They do not at all resemble the dessert described (e.g. "crescent shaped cookies" are shown as round cookies).

I am aware that cakes and desserts come in many variations but it is very confusing when text and picture differ in what seems to be in the very characteristics of the cake/dessert.

Since most of the cakes/desserts are unknown to me, I feel a little lost. Google can probably help me but it would have been nice if the needed information was provided by The Daily Meal...

Sarurah's picture

Clare Sheehan, Kunafa is not a traditional Israeli dish: it's pretty much as Arab as sweets get (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanafeh). Perhaps the location you are looking for is "Palestine" or the "Occupied Palestinian Territories"... the Palestinians have had enough taken from them, leave their sweets to them, at the least!

If you are determined to share an Israeli sweet, I'm sure there are plenty delicious ones you could choose from, like Teiglach or Ingberlach. Cheers!

Sarurah's picture

Sorry for the double-post, this website is awful when it comes to accepting comments.

Sarurah's picture

See above, turns out it was a triple-post lol. Can't delete the extra-postings, but at least I can edit. Salud!

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