5 International Desserts That Are as Sinful as Devil’s Food Cake

Goodbye, beach body
5 International Desserts That Are as Sinful as Devil’s Food Cake


This seven-layer cake is indeed very sinful.

Dessert does not have to have chocolate in it to be sinful, though, in terms of calories, chocolate certainly does seem to take the cake. We looked through our list of 80 desserts around the world and found ones that, well, let’s just say you should eat them in moderation. If you’re on a diet, you should probably avoid these completely — and it won’t be easy. These desserts are decadent and delicious. If you so dare, you can bake many of them at home.

Would you break your diet to try any of these desserts? Let us know by tweeting @thedailymeal.

Basbousa (Egypt)

Basbousa is a semolina cake, which sounds relatively healthy, if you ignore the fact it is completely soaked in simple syrup.  The syrup is usually infused with orange or rose water and topped with nuts, generally almonds.

Dobos Torte (Hungary)

A magnificent sight to behold, this seven-layer sponge cake is layered with chocolate buttercream and capped with caramel.

Gulab Jamun (India)

Gulab jamun are deep-fried, milk solid-filled dough balls covered in a sugary syrup flavored with cardamom seeds, rosewater, or saffron. So, it’s a doughnut, plus fatty milk product, in a pool of syrup. Yikes.

Sticky Toffee Pudding (United Kingdom)

A British classic, sticky toffee pudding is a moist sponge cake made with chopped dates, smothered in toffee sauce, and served with vanilla custard or ice cream. All that stickiness comes from the sugar.

Sultan’s Golden Cake (Turkey)

Perhaps the most sinful thing about this individual-sized cake is its cost: $1,000. Sold exclusively at the Ciragan Palace Kempinski Hotel in Istanbul, this dessert takes 72 hours to prepare and contains figs, quince, apricot, and pears that have been drowned in Jamaican rum for two years. The topping contains caramel, black truffles, and decadent gold leaf.

Rate this Story