Spicy Kimchi Recipe


Nutrition

Cal/Serving: 48
Daily Value: 2%
Servings: 8

Low-Fat
Fat-Free, Low-Fat-Abs, Vegan, Vegetarian, Dairy-Free, Egg-Free, Milk-Free, Peanut-Free, Tree-Nut-Free, Fish-Free, Shellfish-Free, Alcohol-Free
Fat0g1%
Saturated0g0%
Carbs11g4%
Fiber3g14%
Sugars6g0%
Protein2g4%
Sodium1750mg73%
Calcium58mg6%
Magnesium20mg5%
Potassium266mg8%
Iron1mg5%
Zinc0mg2%
Phosphorus43mg6%
Vitamin A750IU15%
Vitamin C67mg111%
Thiamin (B1)0mg6%
Riboflavin (B2)0mg4%
Niacin (B3)1mg3%
Vitamin B60mg11%
Folic Acid (B9)62µg15%
Vitamin E1mg3%
Vitamin K99µg124%
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated0g0%
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated0g0%
Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

Exclusive from The Daily Meal

Wicked Dessert Puffs
Puff pastry pockets filled with a chocolate peanut butter cup candy... now that's wicked good!...
Quick and Easy Chili
It just doesn’t get any easier or more delicious than this! Sautéed ground beef, onion...
Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon
Maybe I am being a little hyperbolic, but the sweet-salty-crisp combination of bacon and maple...

Spicy Kimchi
Sara Remington

I adapted this recipe from one I learned in a workshop at The Asian Culinary Forum in San Francisco with Huynjoo Albrecht, of CookingKorean.com. If you’ve only had commercial kimchi, which is sometimes overly salty and very spicy while lacking dimension, you’ll be surprised at the complexity of this version. Lightly fermented and spicy, to be sure, the nuances of the individual components come through in layers. If you’re worried about making it too spicy, start with less red pepper the first time you make it and see how you like it.

If you have access to a Korean market, buy the medium ground Korean red pepper powder for kimchi, which usually comes in a one-pound plastic bag. Make sure that it doesn’t have salt or other additives. You may also experiment with a milder cayenne pepper; a mild ground red chile, such as New Mexico; or Aleppo pepper, a mild red pepper used in Middle Eastern cooking that has a nice fruity flavor and a similar heat level to Korean pepper. This recipe is written for kosher salt. If you’re using a finer-grained sea salt, you will need to use about 25 percent less.

Adapted from "D.I.Y. Delicious" by Vanessa Barrington. 

Click here to see 7 No-Cook Side Dishes.

3.08
Ratings50

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 ½ cups plus 1 tablespoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1 head Napa cabbage, untrimmed (about 2 ½ pounds)
  • ½ pound daikon radish, peeled and grated on the large holes of a box grater
  • 2 green onions, finely chopped, white and green parts
  • ¼ cup mild ground Korean red pepper (or see note above)
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • One 1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon toasted white sesame seeds

DIRECTIONS

Dissolve 1 ¼ cups of the salt in 2 quarts of water. Test the proper amount of salt by gently placing an egg in the water. If it floats, the salt solution is perfect. If it sinks, add a little more salt.

Peel just the outer leaves from the cabbage and discard or compost them, and then, leaving it untrimmed, quarter it lengthwise through the root end, so the root holds each quarter together. Sprinkle 1 1/4 cups more salt between the cabbage leaves. Starting from the outer layer, lift each leaf and sprinkle salt on it, dividing the salt evenly, so that each layer of cabbage is salted. Put the cabbage in the salted water and place a weighted plate on top to keep it fully submerged.

Toss the grated radish in the remaining 1 tablespoon salt and let it drain in a colander while the cabbage soaks in its water bath.

The cabbage should soak until the heavy, white parts of the cabbage closest to the root end are pliable but not mushy. Try bending 1-2 leaves. If they break, the cabbage hasn’t soaked long enough. It should take 3 or 4 hours, depending on the room’s temperature. In the end, the cabbage should offer a little resistance but not break.

Remove the cabbage from the salted water and rinse it thoroughly under running water several times (this is important or your kimchi will be too salty). Squeeze lightly and place the cabbage quarters root-side up in a colander to drain. Drain for 1 hour. Rinse the daikon, squeeze out the excess moisture, and continue to drain it.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the onions, red pepper, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, and sesame seeds.

Squeeze the drained cabbage to remove as much water as possible. Slice the cabbage crosswise into pieces about 1-1 ½ inches wide. Add it to the bowl with the seasonings. Add the drained daikon and toss to coat thoroughly.

Transfer the kimchi and its juices to a 1-quart, wide-mouth mason jar and push it down with a wooden spoon. Fasten the lid and let it sit undisturbed at room temperature for 4-5 hours, depending on the warmth of the room. Refrigerate for 2-3 days to let the flavors develop before eating. It should taste balanced, but spicy and lightly fermented. It keeps, refrigerated, for several months.

 

Click here to see the 5 Basic Kitchen Tools for Homemade Cooking story. 

Recipe Details

Total time: 45 minutes active; 9 hours plus 3 days passive

Servings: 8

Notes and Substitutions:




Be a Part of the Conversation

Have something to say?
Add a comment (or see what others think).


Post a comment

Add a Comment

Upload a picture of yourself no larger than 3MB, please see Terms for details
CAPTCHA
Please answer this Captcha to prove you are human
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
CAPTCHA
Please answer this Captcha to prove you are human