Singaporean-Style Oyster Omelette Recipe

This dish takes me back to the food hawker stalls of Singapore. It's a quintessential street food with a mixture of...
Staff Writer
Singaporean-Style Oyster Omelette Recipe

Will Budiaman

This dish takes me back to the food hawker stalls of Singapore. It's a quintessential street food with a mixture of textures (crispy, fluffy, and gooey) and flavors (savory, briny, tart, and spicy). It's the ultimate power breakfast. The omelette isn't really an omelette in the classical sense — it's chopped up after being cooked in hot oil and has charred, crispy edges with a gooey center. It might be more accurate to call it a fried scrambled egg. It's best eaten hot, immediately after it leaves the pan.

Click here to see 7 Outstanding Oyster Recipes. 

Ingredients

For the omelette:

  • 1 tablespoon sweet potato or rice flour
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca starch
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 eggs
  • Dash of coriander
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 scallion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 4-5 oysters, cleaned and shucked

For the garnish:

  • 1 scallion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon sambal oelek

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Directions

For the omelette:

Form a slurry by combining the sweet potato flour, tapioca starch, and water in a bowl. Whisk well to combine; make sure there are no lumps.

In another bowl, beat the eggs. Add the coriander, freshly ground black pepper, scallion, and cilantro.

Combine the slurry with the eggs and add the fish sauce.

Heat the oil in a 12-inch non-stick skillet over high heat until almost smoking. Pour in the egg mixture and allow it to cook until the bottom is golden brown. Flip the omelette and brown the other side. Break it up with a wooden spoon. Fold in the oysters. Cook for a few more seconds and then remove from heat.

Serve immediately.

For the garnish:

Garnish the omelette with scallion, cilantro, and sambal oelek.

 

 

 

This post was originally published August 18, 2011

Oyster Shopping Tip

Seafood shopping is quite easy in the general sense. Rule of thumb: if it smells fishy, don't buy. Fresh seafood should smell mild and more like the ocean and sea water rather than fish.

Oyster Cooking Tip

Looking for a quick mid-week dinner? Seafood is a safe bet. It's quick to cook and simple recipes can get dinner on the table in 20 minutes.