Why You Should Serve Food at Your Next Meeting

Even the most professional of gatherings are sure to benefit; here’s why
Staff Writer
Meet over a meal

Natalie Norton & Nathan Williams

Meet over a meal

If it feels appropriate, have food — either snacks or a meal — at your next meeting. Go ahead, try it out. Food has its place at nearly every get-together, even ones perceived as ‘too stuffy’ or professional. It is a shared interest, a common thread between people. At a meeting or gathering that has a specific purpose or goal to be reached, food can even help stimulate creativity and fresh ideas. Additionally, it sets the stage for a more relaxed atmosphere, and invites alternate conversation for a laid-back agenda.

Not only does planning and discussing over food set a more energetic stage, it provides those attending with nutrients and food that more literally boosts their creative juices. Eating, and eating the right things, has everything to do with ones’ creative capacity. There is a landslide of evidence proving that eating the right kind of foods can increase your brain-power, in addition to providing other health benefits. When planning the menu for a meeting, choose things that will influence the amount of good ideas generated and the speed that they will come.

Carbohydrates are the fuel for your brain. Set the table with plenty of whole grain foods, which break down slower and provide creative energy for hours. Antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids are also important for a healthy brain. Try planning a meal involving some of the following foods that provide these building blocks: tomato, avocado, chicken, shrimp, kiwi, eggs, almonds, and grapes.

In March, an idea still in embryo called for a meeting. We gathered together to organize our thoughts into what is now Kinfolk over a relaxed and sunny brunch. Amongst the excitement of a unique and new project, the food allowed us to enjoy our conversation and provided us with a comfortable environment conducive to great ideas. Food invited us to take ownership of the meeting and self-organize our thoughts in a shared and open space.

By Catherine Searle Williams


Catherine is a part of the Kinfolk team. To see what inspires her when she's not working, visit her blog HEREBLACK.

Kinfolk is guide to small gatherings, a marriage of our appreciation for art and design and our love for spending time with family and friends. Click here to read more of Kinfolk online.

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