Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce and Ricotta Turkey Meatballs

Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce and Ricotta Turkey Meatballs
Staff Writer
Emma Laperruque

“In prison, dinner was always a big thing,” Henry, the Goodfellas narrator, explains. Pauley does the prep work: shaving garlic with a razor of all things, so it melts like butter the second it hits a hot pan. Vinnie does the tomato sauce for the pasta, making his meatballs with veal, beef, and pork. Unfortunately for Vinnie, his fellow inmates give him flack for using too many onions. We like the idea of leaving behind the all-beef meatball, but we do think that using three onions per two cans of tomatoes is a little… much. As is having that much red meat (sorry, fellas). Accordingly, our rendition of the classic prison meal features another meat: turkey. Vinnie says “all the flavor” is in the pork, but we think these meatballs might be able to change his mind.   

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4
Servings
571
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the ricotta turkey meatballs

  • 1 1/2  slices whole wheat bread, crusts removed and cubed
  • 1/2  Cup  whole milk
  • 1  Pound  ground turkey
  • 1/2  yellow onion, grated
  • cloves garlic
  • 1  Tablespoon  minced parsley
  • 1  Tablespoon  minced basil
  • egg
  • 2  Tablespoons  whole milk ricotta
  • 1  Tablespoon  grated parmesan
  • 2  Teaspoons  salt
  • 2  Teaspoons  freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2  Cup  olive oil

For the tomato sauce

  • 1/4  Cup  olive oil
  • 1  Tablespoon  dried red pepper flakes
  • cloves garlic
  • onion, grated
  • Two  28-ounce cans plum tomatoes, preferably San Marzano
  • basil stalks, leaves still attached

Directions

For the ricotta turkey meatballs

In a small bowl submerge the cubed bread in the milk. Let sit for 10 minutes.

Toss the rest of the ingredients in a large bowl. When the bread is appropriately soggy, squeeze out the excess liquid from the bread, and add the bread to the rest of the ingredients. Using your hands, mix everything together.

Form the meatballs into whatever size you like (I made each about 3 tablespoons). 

Put a couple sauté pans over medium heat. Add a few glugs of olive oil to each. When the oil shimmers and a bread crumb dropped in fizzes immediately, add the meatballs. Brown well on each side until just cooked through, about 15 minutes total. 

For the tomato sauce

Heat olive oil in a stockpot with the red pepper flakes over medium heat. When the oil begins to sizzle, add the garlic and swirl in the pan for a minute or so. Add the onion and cook until translucent, stirring occasionally. Empty in the tomato cans, stir to combine, and add the basil stalks. Simmer for at least 15 minutes, crushing the tomatoes against the side of the pot every so often. Add in the cooked meatballs and cook for at least 10 minutes more.

Serve tomato sauce and meatballs with hot whole wheat spaghetti.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
51g
73%
Sugar
5g
6%
Saturated Fat
37g
100%
Cholesterol
98mg
33%
Carbohydrate, by difference
5g
4%
Protein
25g
54%
Vitamin A, RAE
48µg
7%
Vitamin B-12
2µg
83%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
2mg
3%
Calcium, Ca
118mg
12%
Choline, total
70mg
16%
Folate, total
12µg
3%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
33mg
10%
Niacin
7mg
50%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
293mg
42%
Selenium, Se
25µg
45%
Sodium, Na
289mg
19%
Vitamin D (D2 + D3)
1µg
7%
Water
118g
4%
Zinc, Zn
4mg
50%

Spaghetti Shopping Tip

Italian food is about simplicity and letting the ingredients shine. So make sure you get ingredients that are great quality and flavor. Farmers markets and specialty stores will have great produce and products. Just be sure to have some great olive oil.

Spaghetti Cooking Tip

Unlike other highly regarded cuisines, Italian cooking is usually simple to make with many dishes having only 4 to 8 ingredients. Italian cooks rely chiefly on the quality of the ingredients rather than on elaborate preparation.

Spaghetti Wine Pairing

Cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot, malbec, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nero d'avola, primitivo, sangiovese, or carménère with meat- or tomato-based sauces; grenache or chardonnay with cream-based sauces; pinot gris/grigio, albariño, or other fresh white wines (for instance, soave, Italian sauvignon, or grillo) with seafood pasta; nebbiolo, dolcetto, or barbera with most non-seafood pasta.