Kale and Feta Burrito

Kale and Feta Burrito
Kale and Feta Burrito
Tim McGeever
Kale and Feta Burrito

I shamefully admit that I am new to the kale wagon. I resisted the trend for quite a while, but recently caved and have since fallen head over heels for the leafy green love machine. When faced with the challenge of creating a vegetarian burrito that stood out from the pack, I immediately turned to kale for the starring role. Joined by sautéed red onions, pinto beans, brown rice and, wait for it — feta cheese — I knew I had found the cast of ingredients I needed. This one's a knockout.

Click here to see 6 Burrito Recipes: Simple or Sophisticated, You Decide.

2
Servings
218
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • One  15-ounce can pinto beans, drained and rinsed
  • Salt, to taste
  • 1  Tablespoon  olive oil
  • red onion, chopped
  • bunch kale, torn into 2- to 3-inch pieces
  • Dash of  cayenne
  • Two  8-inch flour (or spinach) tortillas, steamed lightly
  • 1  Cup  brown rice, cooked
  • 2-4  Tablespoons  crumbled feta

Directions

Heat the beans in a small saucepan over low heat. Add water and some salt to taste, if necessary. 

Meanwhile, heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the red onion and sauté until lightly browned, 6-7 minutes. Add the kale and continue cooking, stirring frequently until the kale begins to wilt. Season with the cayenne.

To serve, place a generous portion of rice, beans, kale, and onions, in the center of each tortilla. Top with feta before folding shut. 

Enjoy!

 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
12g
17%
Sugar
1g
1%
Saturated Fat
9g
38%
Cholesterol
13mg
4%
Carbohydrate, by difference
24g
18%
Protein
4g
9%
Vitamin A, RAE
19µg
3%
Calcium, Ca
84mg
8%
Choline, total
2mg
0%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
9µg
2%
Iron, Fe
1mg
6%
Magnesium, Mg
47mg
15%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
1mg
7%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
128mg
18%
Selenium, Se
2µg
4%
Sodium, Na
139mg
9%
Water
81g
3%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Kale Shopping Tip

Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium.

Kale Cooking Tip

Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.