Crème Fraîche with Chocolate Mousse

Crème Fraîche with Chocolate Mousse

Amy Beadle Roth

The tanginess of the crème fraîche is soothed by the rich and creamy chocolate mousse, which is in turn lightened by the crème fraîche. This recipe uses uncooked egg whites and yolks. Small children or people with compromised immune systems should try another recipe.

6
Servings
124
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 4 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
  • 3 large eggs, separated
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 pint crème fraîche

Directions

In a saucepan over very low heat, melt the chocolate and the butter together. Just before the chocolate finishes melting, remove it from the heat and beat it with a whisk until smooth. Transfer the chocolate mixture to a bowl and beat in the egg yolks with the whisk. Refrigerate. Beat the egg whites with 2 tablespoons of the sugar until the whites hold stiff peaks but are not dry. Set aside. Beat the cream with the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar and the vanilla until it holds soft peaks.

Stir a couple of spoonfuls of the whipped whites into the chocolate mixture to lighten it, then fold in the remaining whites thoroughly but gently. Fold in the cream and refrigerate the mousse until chilled. If you are in a hurry, divide the mousse mixture among six cups; it will chill much faster. Serve the mousse within a day or two of making, under a generous scoop of crème fraîche.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
7g
10%
Sugar
7g
8%
Saturated Fat
3g
13%
Carbohydrate, by difference
14g
11%
Protein
1g
2%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
3µg
3%
Calcium, Ca
7mg
1%
Choline, total
4mg
1%
Fiber, total dietary
1g
4%
Folate, total
16µg
4%
Iron, Fe
1mg
6%
Magnesium, Mg
13mg
4%
Phosphorus, P
33mg
5%
Selenium, Se
2µg
4%
Sodium, Na
80mg
5%

Crème Fraîche Shopping Tip

Ingredients like olive oil, shallots, mustard, cream, stock, and butter will help bring French flavors to your cooking.

Crème Fraîche Cooking Tip

French cuisine is renowned for slow-cooked sauces, however a quick pan sauce will do just as well; after sautéing a piece of meat or fish, remove it from the pan, deglaze with brandy or wine, finish with a touch of butter or cream and voilà!