Classic Pork N' Parsnips Recipe

Classic Pork N' Parsnips Recipe
Staff Writer
Pork N' Parsnips
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Pork N' Parsnips

Here is a classic and delicious recipe for pork and parsnips. This recipe has been adapted from a recipe first published in the spring 1948 issue of Good Housekeeping Magazine. 

4
Servings
378
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1  Pound  pork shoulder, cubed
  • 1/2  Pound  potatoes
  • 1/4  Teaspoon  pepper
  • 1  Pound  parsnips
  • 1/4  Teaspoon  paprika
  • medium-sized onion, chopped
  • chicken bouillon cubes
  • 8-ounce can of peas
  • 1  Teaspoon  salt

Directions

Cut excess fat from porkcubes. Place fat in deep kettle; cook until crispy; remove crisp fat pieces.

In fat left in kettle, thoroughly brown pork. Add salt, pepper, paprika, and onion.

Drain peas; add water and bouillon to canned liquid, and heat in medium-sized sauce pot on medium heat.

Pour liquid over pork; cover and let simmer until tender: about 35 min.

Pare parsnips; remove center core; cut in cubes. Pare potatoes; cut in cubes.

Add parsnips, potatoes, peas to meat; cover; simmer just  for 10 minutes. 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
11g
16%
Sugar
9g
10%
Saturated Fat
4g
17%
Cholesterol
130mg
43%
Carbohydrate, by difference
25g
19%
Protein
43g
93%
Vitamin A, RAE
9µg
1%
Vitamin B-12
3µg
100%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
16mg
21%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
6µg
7%
Calcium, Ca
75mg
8%
Choline, total
177mg
42%
Fiber, total dietary
6g
24%
Folate, total
90µg
23%
Iron, Fe
4mg
22%
Magnesium, Mg
66mg
21%
Niacin
8mg
57%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
312mg
45%
Selenium, Se
45µg
82%
Sodium, Na
481mg
32%
Water
156g
6%
Zinc, Zn
8mg
100%

Pork Shopping Tip

Bone-in cuts tend to be slightly less expensive than their boneless counterparts, and have more flavor.

Pork Cooking Tip

According to the USDA, the recommended internal temperature for cooked pork should be 145 degrees Fahrenheit.

Pork Wine Pairing

Tempranillo, dolcetto, gewürztraminer, or muscat with roast pork; carmènere with  pork sausage; sangiovese, pinotage, or richer sauvignon blancs for stir-fried or braised pork dishes or pork in various sauces; syrah/shiraz, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nero d'avola, or primitivo with barbecued spareribs or pulled pork, or with cochinito en pibil and other Mexican-spiced pork dishes.