Rare, Medium, and Well-Done: Which is Best?

We’re firm believers that no steak should ever be cooked well-done

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

For maximum flavor and juiciness, cook or eat most steak at medium doneness or less.

Rib Eye. This super flavorful and super juicy cut of prime rib is tender when it’s cooked to no more than medium doneness. Rib eye is best when it’s cooked medium-rare; that’s about 6-8 minutes for a 1-inch-thick steak.

(Credit: Flickr/stratman² (2 many pix!))

Sirloin Steak. Sirloin is a lean cut of meat, so it can easily become tough if it’s overcooked. For a tender, juicy sirloin steak, don’t cook the meat past medium doneness. If you have top sirloin, it’s best served rare.

(Credit: Flickr/LeMeridien Hotels and Resorts)

Filet Mignon. Filet mignon is a cut of meat from the heart of the tenderloin. It’s well known as a fork-tender cut of beef. To fully enjoy filet mignon, cook the steak to medium doneness or less, but we recommend medium-rare.

(Credit: Flickr/Kurt VanderScheer)

T-Bone Steak. T-bone steak is a cut that consists of both from the strip loin and tenderloin. If you like your steak cooked to a higher degree of doneness, this is a good cut to choose; T-bone steak is most flavorful and juicy when cooked medium-rare to medium.

(Credit: Flickr/DaMongMan)

New York Strip Steak. This flavorful steak from the heart of the beef loin is best served medium-rare; that’s about 6-8 minutes of cook time for an average strip steak.

(Credit: Flickr/Jon Gales)

Kristie Collado is The Daily Meal's Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @KColladoCook.

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