Enjoying American Brandy

Staff Writer
A brief introduction to American brandy with cocktail recipes.

Photo Sasabune Omakase Modified: Flickr/erin/CC 4.0

Brandy is derived from the Dutch term brandewijn, meaning "burnt wine." The term was known as branntwein or weinbrand in Germany, brandevin in France, and brandywine in England — we have shortened the word simply to brandy.

Made by distilling wine or fruit that is then aged in oak barrels, brandy is made in most countries that produce wine. The difference in brandy varies from country to country — soil, climate, grapes, production methods, and blending give each brandy its own unique flavor and style.

Brandy was introduced to California over 200 years ago by Spanish missionaries. The state produces the largest percentage of American brandy, most of which is made in the San Joaquin Valley to take advantage of the soil, climate, and water.

 

Popular Brands

Carneros Alambic: The alambic (cognac-style) brandy in California.

Christian Brothers Brandy: This brandy is processed and aged in Napa Valley.

E&J Gallo: They produce E&J Brandy (Gold), E&J V.S.O.P. Brandy, and E&J White Brandy.

Germain-Robin: Another excellent alambic brandy from California.

 

Click here for the Lost at Sea Cocktail recipe.

Click here for the E&J Fizz recipe.

Click here The Lei Maker Cocktail recipe.

Click here for the Brandy Alexander recipe.

Click here for the Brandy Milk Punch recipe.

Click here for the Brandy Cocktail recipe.

Click here for the Corpse Reviver recipe.

Click here for the CB Classic Cocktail recipe.

Click here for the Fallen Angel Cocktail recipe.