Anise Drop Cookies - Pastry Chef, Angela Gong - Waterbar Restaurant in San Francisco

Anise Drop Cookies - Pastry Chef, Angela Gong - Waterbar Restaurant in San Francisco
Angela Gong

Known for her sweet creations, Angela Gong, pastry chef at Waterbar in San Francisco, has created some incredible recipes for the holidays. Angela’s Anise Drop Cookies are one of her family favorites, passed along from her grandmother, and one she makes year after year. This special cookie, which looks like a French macaroon, is perfect for any holiday or family celebration! 

12
Servings
158
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

Anise Drop Cookies

  • 1 1/2  Cup  Flour
  • 1/4  Teaspoon  baking powder
  • Eggs (plus water to equal ½ cup)
  • 1  Cup  Sugar
  • 1/4  Teaspoon  anise extract
  • 2  Teaspoons  anise seeds (optional)
  • 1  Teaspoon  fennel pollen (optional)

Directions

Anise Drop Cookies

Sift flour and baking powder together.  Set aside.

Beat eggs, sugar and anise extract in a mixer with a whisk attachment.  Whip until thick and pale – ribbon stage. 

Sift dry ingredients into egg mixture, folding ¼ at a time. 

Fold in anise seeds with the final addition of flour.

Drop or pipe teaspoonfuls onto greased sheet pan or parchment paper. 

Sprinkle fennel pollen on top decoratively.

Allow to dry, uncovered for 8-10 hours or overnight.  Keep out of sight or children and spouses will be tempted to eat them. 

Bake at 350 degrees for 5-6 minutes or until cooked through.
 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
7g
10%
Sugar
1g
1%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Carbohydrate, by difference
22g
17%
Protein
2g
4%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
1µg
1%
Calcium, Ca
17mg
2%
Fiber, total dietary
3g
12%
Folate, total
15µg
4%
Iron, Fe
1mg
6%
Magnesium, Mg
15mg
5%
Phosphorus, P
47mg
7%
Selenium, Se
4µg
7%
Sodium, Na
148mg
10%
Water
12g
0%

Cookie Shopping Tip

Be sure to purchase the correct flour a recipe calls for – flours differ in gluten or protein content, making each suited for specific tasks.

Cookie Cooking Tip

Insert a toothpick into the center of cakes, bar cookies, and quick breads to test for doneness – it should come out clean or only have a few crumbs clinging to it.

Cookie Wine Pairing

Milk is more traditional with cookies than wine in the U.S., but a few cookies and a glass of sweet wine make a simple, enjoyable dessert. Sweet chenin blanc, muscat, or amontillado sherry with nut-based cookies; sauternes or sweet German wines with sugar cookies; cabernet sauvignon or cabernet franc with chocolate desserts; Italian vin santo with biscotti.