Here Are the Dieting Myths You Have to Stop Believing

Don’t fall for these dieting wives’ tales

Worst Dieting Myths
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Shed pounds by shedding your preconceived dieting notions.

Losing weight is tough and it can often be an uphill battle for most people. So everyone is looking for a quick fix or a simple solution to shedding the pounds. And one thing there is no shortage of is the number of ever-increasing dieting myths that have many people running in circles when it comes to getting in better shape.

Click here for the 10 Dieting Myths You Have to Stop Believing (Slideshow)

The Daily Meal sat down with Dr. Sue Decotiis, a board certified doctor based in New York City with a specialty in medical weight loss and hormone replacement therapy, to talk about the biggest and most flagrant dieting myths that people should be aware of.

Many of the most popular dieting myths can actually be harmful to your health and overall weight loss goals, believes Decotiis. “One of the biggest things I see people clinging to is the myth of the low-fat diet. Even though fats contain more calories per ounce, it is really the sugar in our diets that are making us obese,” she said. “We’re consuming so much more sugar as a nation compared to thirty years ago.”

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Another myth Decotiis debunks is the use of cleanses and detoxes as a way to lose weight. “These juices are not the way to go,” said Decotiis. “And the detoxes have so many carbs in them and you’re not getting any protein. If you want to detox, you need protein.

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Additionally, the “calories in, calories out” theory that many purists tend to believe isn’t true because every person’s body is different. Decotiis notes that weight loss ultimately depends on what a person’s gut bacteria looks like, how they absorb nutrients and what types of food affects their metabolism. While the calorie counting theory sounds like a winner offhand, it happens to be a myth.

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Finally, another dieting trend that sounds like a no brainer is to take a probiotic. While in essence probiotics can be good in helping rebuild your inner bacteria, they are not all created equal. Decotiis cautions against picking up a store-brand probiotic thinking it will do the trick. Ideally, those looking to take a probiotic should consult with a doctor to decide what type of probiotic is best for them.

Slow and Steady Weight Loss Is Best

diet myths

If someone is going to lose weight on their own, they need to take it off as quickly as possible, says Decotiis. “After you lose a significant amount of weight, you only have a certain amount of time before your metabolism readjusts and it goes down,” noted Decotiis. “When the metabolic rate readjusts, people will get hungrier and eat and gain the weight back.”

All Fruits and Vegetables Will Help You Lose Weight

diet myth

Sadly, even on a diet filled with fruits and vegetables, people can’t be sure that what they are eating is healthy. Many fruits and veggies happen to be GMOs (such as strawberries and apples) and those chemicals will hinder people from losing weight and affect their metabolic rate. Some fruits are extremely high in sugar like strawberries, so be sure that you’re looking into their nutritional value before you eat.

Click here to see more dieting myths list. 


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1 Comments

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Either Kristen Oliveri or Dr. Sue Decotiis is badly misinformed when it comes to fruits, vegetables, and GMOs. Firstly, 99.9% of fruits and vegetables on the market have nothing to do with GMOs, so this is a made-up "fact". Secondly, the statement "those chemicals will hinder people from losing weight and affect their metabolic rate" makes absolutely no sense. What chemicals? GMOs are chemicals? Does either the author or the so-called expert actually understand what a GMO is, other than vaguely associating the term with "bad stuff"? If these statements lack credibility, I wonder how much other content on The Daily Meal and MSN Health is unfounded, non-fact-based statements meant to sell advertising space rather than to inform? - Dr. Gregory Lang, Professor, Michigan State University

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