Around the World in 80 Desserts

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Chocolate Soufflé with Grand Marnier (France)
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Chocolate Soufflé with Grand Marnier (France)
Description

What is chocolate soufflé? Chocolate soufflé is a decadent and time-honored dessert in France. Chocolate soufflé is a lightly baked cake comprised of egg yolks, beaten egg whites, sugar, and a gooey chocolate interior. The dessert has a reputation for being notoriously difficult to execute, as the dish has to be served immediately to prevent the soufflé from dropping and becoming dense.

In France, the soufflé is often infused with Grand Marnier, an orange liqueur that accents the richness of the chocolate with a citrusy flavor.

Where to try chocolate soufflé: Le Soufflé, Paris, France

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Quindim (Brazil)
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Quindim (Brazil)
Description

What is quindim? Quindim is a signature Brazilian dessert with a bright yellow color, glistening surface, and a custard consistency similar to flan. The recipe for quindim includes ingredients like coconut, sugar, butter, and egg yolks, which give the dish its distinctive color.

The origins of the dessert are said to be rooted in Portuguese cuisine, which often incorporates a substantial number of egg yolks in its recipes. In the 17th century, quindim was modified by slaves in the Bahia region of Brazil to include coconut, which is readily found in the region.

Where to try quindim: Benito Quindim, Sao Paolo, Brazil

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Flickr / JorgeBRAZIL

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Apple Pie (United States)
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Apple Pie (United States)
Description

What is apple pie? Apple pie is heralded as the quintessential American dessert, serving as a culinary symbol of the nation's prosperity and pride in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Apple pie consists of a pastry pie crust and an apple filling often seasoned with nutmeg or cinnamon. The pie takes about an hour in the oven to bake.

Interestingly, apple pie-making does not originate from the United States, but rather it was a concept brought over by the Pilgrims from England, where the pies were made with unsweetened apples covered by an inedible shell. Eventually, the recipe developed into the well-known dessert enjoyed today.

Where to try apple pie: Apple Pie Bakery Café, Hyde Park, New York.

To check out more places around the world to get apple pie, click here.

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Gelato (Italy)
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Gelato (Italy)
Description

What is gelato? Gelato differs from ice cream in its flavor and texture. The frozen dessert is made with milk as opposed to cream, which gives the dish a lower fat content, and has less air whipped into it than ice cream, making it denser and often more intense in flavor.

Gelato is an Italian term that means "frozen." The history of the dessert is rooted in 16th century Italy, where according to many accounts, a Florentine named Bernardo Buontalenti presented his gelato creation to the royal court of Caterina dei Medici.

Where to try gelato: Gelateria Veneta, Lucca, Italy

To check out more places around the world to get gelato, click here.

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Hemera / thinkstock

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Galub Jamun (India)
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Galub Jamun (India)
Description

What is gulab jamun? Gulab jamun are deep-fried dough balls covered in a sugary syrup flavored with cardamom seeds, rosewater, or saffron. The name of the dish is a combination of the Persian word "gulab," which means "rose" and refers to the rosewater-scented syrup used in the dish, and the Hindi word "jamun," which is a South Asian fruit.

In addition to India, the dessert is also enjoyed in countries like Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh. The dish is based on an Arabic dessert called luqmat al-qadi and is often served at marriages and major celebrations like the Indian Diwali festival and Muslim Eid-ul-Fitr and Eid al-Adha festivals.

Where to try gulab jamun: Bengal Sweet Corner, Delhi

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Maple Taffy (Canada)
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Maple Taffy (Canada)
Description

What is maple taffy? Maple taffy is a sugary sweet Canadian confection traditionally made from maple syrup and snow. Maple syrup is boiled to 234 degrees Fahrenheit and then poured onto fresh snow, where the cold temperature hardens the concoction into an edible treat that consumers often use wooden sticks or dinner forks to eat. Often, maple taffy is served with coffee, tea, donuts, or even sour dill pickles.

Where to try maple taffy: Maple Taffy is a seasonal treat that can be found scattered around Quebec and Eastern Ontario, especially in early spring.

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Flickr / JaimeW

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Babka (Poland)
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Babka (Poland)
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What is babka? Babka is a Polish dish that resembles a brioche-like cake with a spongy texture. The dessert's flavor is sweet and the cake is usually filled with fruits like raisins.

"Babka" is a Polish word which means "grandmother," and is the name of the pastry because of the dish's cylindrical and corrugated shape, which resembles the pleats of an older woman's skirt.

Where to try babka: A. Blikle, Warsaw

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Wiki / Magnus-Manske

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Basbousa (Egypt)
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Basbousa (Egypt)
Description

What is basbousa? Basbousa is an Egyptian street food that is a semi-sweet semolina cake often topped with spoonfuls of lime curd, whipped cream, and berries.

Where to try basbousa: El Abd Pastry, Cairo

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Wiki / Aldousari

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Hokey Pokey Ice Cream (New Zealand)
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Hokey Pokey Ice Cream (New Zealand)
Description

What is hokey pokey ice cream? Hokey Pokey is a popular ice cream flavor in New Zealand with vanilla flavoring and pieces of honeycomb toffee and chocolate.

The origin of hokey pokey’s name comes from the 19th century, when "hokey pokey" was used as a slang term to refer to the ice cream sold by New York's street vendors.

Where to try hokey pokey ice cream: New Zealand Natural, Auckland

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Flickr / OpenCage

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Brazo Gitano (Venezuela)
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Brazo Gitano (Venezuela)
Description

What is brazo de gitano? Brazo de gitano is the Spanish version of a Swiss roll, a sponge cake filled with cream, but other variations are filled with strawberry and blackberry jam, coffee cream, or chocolate. Brazo de gitano is often covered with icing, chocolate, meringue, cream, or burnt crema catalana, a custardy topping similar to French crème brûlée.

Where to try brazo de gitano: Danubio, Caracas

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Flickr / BocaDorada

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Baklava (Turkey)
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Baklava (Turkey)
Description

What is baklava? Baklava is a famous Turkish pastry consisting of fruit, nuts, and sometimes rice sandwiched between thinly rolled layers of syrupy phyllo dough.

Baklava was inspired by an ancient Assyrian dish of dried fruit and pastry and is often served with Turkish coffee. Popular flavors of baklava include pistachio, walnut, almond, rosewater, lemon, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

Where to try baklava: Karaköy Güllüolu, Istanbul

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Caakiri (Niger)
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Caakiri (Niger)
Description

What is caakiri? Caakiri is popular in West African countries and is similar to rice pudding. Ingredients for caakiri include couscous, cream, vanilla yogurt, raisins, butter, nutmeg, and sometimes a pineapple paste. Usually, the dish is served chilled.

Where to try caakiri: de Smaak van Afrika, Rotterdam

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Flickr / LondonBrad

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Belgian Waffles (Belgium)
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Belgian Waffles (Belgium)
Description

What are Belgian waffles? Waffles are the signature dessert of Belgium, originating with a recipe from the Middle Ages, when waffles were sold as unleavened crisp cakes made of barley and oats baked in a wafer iron.

In Belgium, there are two types of waffles: the Brussels waffle and the Liege waffle. The Brussels waffle is what is universally known as the Belgian waffle and is served with chocolate, fruit, or whipped cream.

The Liege waffle is baked from brioche bread dough and is said to be chewier, sweeter, and richer than the Brussels waffle. Popular Liege waffle flavors include plain, vanilla, and cinnamon.

Where to try Belgian waffles: Aux Gaufres de Bruxelles, Brussels

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Wiki / Ssolbergj

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Vlaii (Holland)
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Vlaii (Holland)
Description

What is vlaii? Vlaii is a traditional Dutch pastry tart topped with fruit and whipped cream and often served on Easter or at weddings and birthdays in Holland. Vlaii has a spongy bottom and can come with myriad different toppings — one Dutch national bakery chain offers at least 50 to try.

Where to try vlaii: In den Ouden Vogelstruys, Maastricht

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Flickr / gkaas

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Sopaipillas (Chile)
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Sopaipillas (Chile)
Description

What are sopaipillas? Chilean sopaipillas are crispy, deep-fried pastries often topped with honey or syrup. What makes sopaipillas different from scones is the recipe's use of zapallo squash, an ingredient that gives the dough a yellow color. Sweet sopaipillas are sometimes dipped in cinnamon and black beet sugar, though a salty version of the treat is also popular.

Where to try sopaipillas: Panadería Castano, Santiago

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Wiki / Hohum

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Tangyuan (China)
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Tangyuan (China)
Description

What are tangyuan? Tangyuan are colorful, glutinous rice balls filled with black sesame, peanut, and red bean pastes. Tangyuan are often served in a sweet broth of ginger and rock sugar. The chewy balls are often served on the winter solstice and at other Chinese holidays.

Where to try tangyuan: Bellagio Café, Beijing

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Flickr / avlxyz

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Sticky Toffee Pudding (England)
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Sticky Toffee Pudding (England)
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What is sticky toffee pudding? Hailing from the Lake District in northwest England, sticky toffee pudding is a rich, gooey, spongy British cake smothered in sweet toffee sauce. The cake itself is made of dates, butter, sugar, eggs, cinnamon, and sometimes Ovaltine.

Where to try sticky toffee pudding: Cartmel Village Shop, Cumbria

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Flickr / chatirygirl

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Pavlova (Australia)
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Pavlova (Australia)
Description

What is pavlova? Pavlova is a popular dessert in Australia and New Zealand of meringue crust topped with whipped cream and fresh fruits, such as kiwi and strawberries. Pavlova is named for Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova, who was known for her lithe and airy style of dancing, which is similar to the texture of the dessert.

There is an ongoing controversy over whether pavlova is native to New Zealand or Australia and despite the Oxford English Dictionary stating in 2010 that the dish comes from New Zealand, pavlova is still enjoyed and debated in both regions.

Where to try pavlova: Black Star Pastry, Sydney

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Flickr / Martin-Hipp

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Mochi Ice Cream (Japan)
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Mochi Ice Cream (Japan)
Description

What is mochi ice cream? Mochi ice cream is a signature Japanese treat that infuses chewy mochi, small pastel-colored glutinous rice cakes dusted with powdered sugar, with sweet and fruit-flavored ice cream. One variation is mochi ice cream balls, which are ice cream covered in mochi.

Where to try mochi ice cream: MochiCream, Tokyo

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Wiki / Charles-Nguyen

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Mole de Platanos (Guatemala)
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Mole de Platanos (Guatemala)
Description

What are mole de platanos? Mole de platanos are fried plantains covered in melted chocolate sauce and sesame seeds.

Where to find mole de platanos: Amalia's Restaurant, Los Angeles

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Sacher Torte (Austria)
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Sacher Torte (Austria)
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What is Sacher torte? Created in 1832 when a chef's apprentice named Franz Sacher presented his sweet creation to Prince Metternich, the Sacher torte is a dense, bittersweet chocolate sponge cake with a layer of apricot jam filling.

Where to try it: The Hotel Sacher Wien. In 1998, the Hotel Sacher Wien made a 2.5-meter Sacher torte cake that made it into the Guinness Book of World Records.

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Flickr / ComunicaTI

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Flan (Spain)
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Flan (Spain)
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What is flan? Flan (also known as crème caramel) is a Spanish egg custard topped with caramel sauce. Flan's basic ingredients are eggs, milk, and sugar, which give the dish its gel-like texture. Variations of flan are made with honey, lemon zest, crushed almonds, and orange flavoring.

Where to try flan: Cafe Dore, Barcelona

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Flickr / Jing-a-Ling

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Bibingka (Phillippines)
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Bibingka (Phillippines)
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What is bibingka? Similar in appearance to a Western pancake, bibingka is a sweet rice cake covered in butter and sugar, and served with grated coconut. Bibingka is served most often in the Christmas season, when locals buy the treat from street vendors after church.

Where to try bibingka: Ferino's Bibingka, Quezon City

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Flickr / whologwhy

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Arroz con Leche (Mexico)
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Arroz con Leche (Mexico)
Description

What is arroz con leche? Arroz con leche is a sweetened rice pudding with a thick and creamy consistency, often infused with cinnamon and raisins, which is popular in Mexico and many Latin American countries.

Where to try arroz con leche: Mi Casa Restaurant, Cabo San Lucas

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Flickr / trinidad-sky

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Thai Mango Sticky Rice (Thailand)
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Thai Mango Sticky Rice (Thailand)
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What is Thai mango sticky rice? Popular during Thai New Year's celebrations but eaten year-round, Thai mango sticky rice is a combination of sweet sticky rice, fresh mango slices, and coconut sauce. Sometimes the notoriously pungent durian is used in place of mango.

Where to try Thai mango sticky rice: Chatuchak Market, Bangkok

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Flickr / blitzmaerker

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Faloodeh (Iran)
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Faloodeh (Iran)
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What is faloodeh? Faloodeh is a Persian frozen dessert dating back to 400 B.C. that is a slushy combination of rosewater, lime juice, sugar, and noodles. Garnishes for faloodeh include pistachios, mint, and sour cherry syrup.

Where to try faloodeh: Shah Abbas, Los Angeles

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Wiki / SreeBot

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Che Dau Xanh (Vietnam)
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Che Dau Xanh (Vietnam)
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What is che dau xanh? Che dau xanh is a Vietnamese sweet mung bean soup served most frequently on special occasions like New Year’s or memorial days. Che dau xanh is served hot, cold, or over ice and is topped with tapioca, jellies, glutinous rice balls, and fruit.

Where to try che dau xanh: Food vendors in or around Don Xuan Market, Hanoi

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Flickr / morning_rumtea

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Alfajores (Argentina)
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Alfajores (Argentina)
Description

What are alfajores? This Latin American treat is a popular dessert in Argentina. It's simply dulce de leche filling sandwiched between two shortbread cookies.

The word "alfajor" is rooted in the Arab word for "honeycomb." The cookies are often served with coffee and traditionally dipped in chocolate, though "snow alfajores" are dipped in powdered sugar and coconut.

Where to try alfajores: Cachafaz Alfajores, Buenos Aires

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Flickr / jamieanne

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Kanafeh (Israel)
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Kanafeh (Israel)
Description

What is kanafeh? Kanafeh is a sweet phyllo dough or semolina pastry stuffed with goat cheese and drenched in syrup. This Arab dessert is popular in many Middle Eastern countries.

Where to try kanafeh: Jafar Sweets in Jerusalem, where kanafeh is made fresh daily.

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Flickr / avlxyz

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Ma'amoul (Syria)
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Ma'amoul (Syria)
Description

What is ma'amoul? Ma'amoul cookies, a ubiquitous treat in Syria and Lebanon, are made with semolina and filled with walnuts, coarsely chopped pistachios, or pitted dates.

Where to try ma'amoul: Semiramis Pastries, Damascus

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Flickr / upload-bot

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Tres Leches (Costa Rica)
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Tres Leches (Costa Rica)
Description

What is tres leches? Tres leches is a Latin American dessert consisting of a very moist cake made with evaporated milk, sweetened condensed milk, and cream, and a topping of sugar, vanilla, and whipped cream.

Where to try tres leches: Grano de Oro Restaurant, San Jose

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Flickr / neil-conway

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Passion Fruit Mousse (Paraguay)
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Passion Fruit Mousse (Paraguay)
Description

What is passion fruit mousse? Passion fruits are native to the subtropical region of Paraguay. Passion fruit mousse is made with milk, heavy cream, and strained passion fruit pulp, which are mixed with a gelatin, egg whites, and sugar.

Where to try passion fruit mousse: Paulista Grill, Asunción

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Sfouf (Lebanon)
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Sfouf (Lebanon)
Description

What is sfouf? Sfouf is sweet, yellow Lebanese almond cake made with semolina dough. The dessert's yellow color comes from the use of turmeric seasoning in the recipe.

Where to try sfouf: Al Bohsali Sweets, Beirut

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Flickr / eyelitphoto

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Apple Strudel (Germany)
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Apple Strudel (Germany)
Description

What is apple strudel? Apple strudel is a flaky pastry covered in caramelized or powdered sugar and filled with sliced apples, cinnamon, raisins, and roasted breadcrumbs. Apple strudel is served warm, often with whipped cream, vanilla sauce, or vanilla ice cream.

Where to try apple strudel: Theodore Tucher in Berlin, where George Bush and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have eaten the flaky dessert.

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Flickr / ralph-and-jenny

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Wienerbrød (Denmark)
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Wienerbrød (Denmark)
Description

What is wienerbrød? Wienerbrød, known in America as a Danish, is the national pastry of Denmark. Wienerbrøds often have a fruit, cheese, nut, jam, cream, or custard filling. Wienerbrød is actually an Austrian word that means "Viennese bread," as it was a group of Austrian bakers who originally created the pastry in the 1800s.

Where to try wienerbrød: La Glace, Copenhagen

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Wiki / Karmosin

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Milk Tart (South Africa)
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Milk Tart (South Africa)
Description

What is a milk tart? Similar to a buttermilk pie, the South African milk tart is a pie composed of a flaky pie crust and white, custard-like filling. The pie is lightly seasoned and dusted with cinnamon and is often served at tea time.

Where to try a milk tart: Jonkershuis, Cape Town

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Flickr / Arnold - Goodway

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Pasteis de Nata (Macau)
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Pasteis de Nata (Macau)
Description

What are pasteis de nata? Pasteis de nata are small, egg tarts. They have a custard-like consistency and are often served with powdered sugar or cinnamon sprinkled on top.

Where to try pasteis de nata: Lord Stow's Bakery and Cafe in Coloane Town Sqaure, Macau

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Flickr / acme

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Dulce de Leche (Cuba)
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Dulce de Leche (Cuba)
Description

What is dulce de leche? Dulce de leche is a thick, tan-colored confection made of caramelized sugar and condensed milk that is eaten on its own or poured over ice cream, cakes, or cookies.

Where to try dulce de leche: Cake's, Montevideo

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Flickr / Frabisa

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Kueh Bangkit (Malaysia)
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Kueh Bangkit (Malaysia)
Description

What is kueh bangkit? Kueh bangkit are coconut cookies that are a staple at Malaysian holidays, particularly New Year’s celebrations.

Kueh bangkit are floral-shaped cookies that are crumbly on the outside and airy on the inside, and melt in the mouth. The traditional recipe calls for tapioca flour, pandan, coconut milk, sugar, and eggs. yolks.

Where to try kueh bangkit: While mostly homemade, kueh bangkit can be found in night markets around Malaysia, especially before big festivities.

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Wiki / Christopherkent

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Bubur Cha-Cha (Singapore)
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Bubur Cha-Cha (Singapore)
Description

What is bubur cha-cha? This Southeast Asian treat is a sweet coconut milk soup loaded with sweet potatoes, taro, and black-eyed peas. The sweet potatoes are often dyed with yellow, orange, and purple.

Where to try bubur cha-cha: Traditional Desserts, 64 Temple Street, Singapore

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Flickr / tristankenney

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Galaktoboureko (Greece)
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Galaktoboureko (Greece)
Description

What is galaktoboureko? Galaktoboureko is a custard-like pie with a phyllo dough pastry shell often smothered in a cinnamon, lemon, and sugar syrup.

Where to try galaktoboureko: Konstantinidis Pastry Chain, Athens

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Cua Bing (Taiwan)
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Cua Bing (Taiwan)
Description

What is cua bing? Cua bing is a shaved ice concoction common in Asia that originated in Taiwan. The finely shaved ice, which resembles a mound of snow, is drizzled with condensed milk and topped with caramelized sugar and fresh fruit like mangos and strawberries or red beans.

Where to try cua bing: (Three Siblings) in Ximending, Taipei’s answer to Tokyo’s Roppongi. The cua bing is topped with a scoop of ice cream. While there, scribble your name on the shop’s graffiti-covered walls.

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Wiki / John800104

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Snuour (Iceland)
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Snuour (Iceland)
Description

What is snuour? Snuour is the Icelandic version of cinnamon rolls, which are frosted with melted chocolate and other flavored glazes.

Where to try snuour: Sandholt Bakery, Reykjavik

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Flickr / gak

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Fattigman (Norway)
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Fattigman (Norway)
Description

What is fattigman? Fattigman, also known as "poor man's cookies," are cookies made of eggs, sugar, butter, heavy cream, cardamom, sugar, and the optional cognac or brandy, and then fried instead of baked. Often cut into diamond and bow shapes, the cookies are covered with powdered sugar and have become a Norwegian holiday specialty.

Where to try fattigman: Sarah Jane's Bakery, Minneapolis

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Kiisseli (Finland)
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Kiisseli (Finland)
Description

What is kiisseli? Kiisseli is a thickened berry stew made with red berry juice, potato starch, sugar, and mixed berries. The name of the dessert originates from a Slavic word meaning "a sour substance," as mostly sour fruits are used to prepare this dish. Popular kiisseli flavors include blueberry, prune, apricot, and strawberry.

Where to try kiisseli: Kiisseli can be purchased at many supermarkets around Finland. A popular brand of Kiisseli is Ekströms.

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Wiki / Kunetskiy

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Guinness Cake (Ireland)
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Guinness Cake (Ireland)
Description

What is Guinness cake? Guinness cake is an Irish dessert that infuses Guinness beer into a pastry concoction of flour, cinnamon, ginger, raisons, lemon, and eggs.

The cake is an Irish culinary tradition, served on Christmas and St. Patrick's Day.

Where to try Guinness cake: Gilroy's, Guinness Storehouse, Dublin

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Flickr / looseid

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Zhele (Ukraine)
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Zhele (Ukraine)
Description

What is zhele? Zhele is a gelatin Jell-O-like dessert composed of fruit juice and sugar. Fruits used in zhele include cherries and pears, though jellied chocolate and milk are sometimes added too.

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Flickr / iapain

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Syrniki (Russia)
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Syrniki (Russia)
Description

What is syrniki? Syrniki is a traditional Russian treat eaten at breakfast and for dessert that is made of golden brown, cottage cheese-infused dough and topped with fruit. Syrniki are sometimes served with a side of sour cream.

Where to try syrniki: Vogue Café, Moscow

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Wiki / Magnus-Maske

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Ovocne Knedliky (Czech Republic)
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Ovocne Knedliky (Czech Republic)
Description

What are ovocne knedliky: Ovocne knedliky, also known as fruit dumplings, typically include strawberries, plums, peaches, apricots, and cherries.

Where to try ovocne knedliky: Zlata Praha Restaurant, New York

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Flickr / uair01

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Kurtos Kalacs (Transylvania)
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Kurtos Kalacs (Transylvania)
Description

What is kurtos kalacs? Originating in Transylvania, kurtos kalacs is a sticky twisted pastry topped with sugar, cinnamon, walnuts, chocolate, or coconut. The sweet treat is also called a "chimney cake," for the large amount of steam that rises from the pastry when removed from the oven, which resembles a chimney’s smoke plume.

Where to try kurtos kalacs: Karoly Kurtoskalacs, Bucharest

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Wiki / Zlerman

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Verwurrelt Gedanken (Luxembourg)
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Verwurrelt Gedanken (Luxembourg)
Description

What is verwurrelt gedanken: Verwurrelt Gedanken is a small, deep-fried pastry made with flour, butter, eggs, milk, and sugar dough that is frosted with icing sugar. The dessert is served most frequently during Fuesent, the Carnival season in February.

Where to try verwurrelt gedanken: the Christmas markets in Luxembourg

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Flickr / avlxyz

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Mandazi (Kenya)
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Mandazi (Kenya)
Description

What are mandazi? Mandazi are a common pastry throughout East Africa that are typically served with tea and coffee. Though less sweet than typical Western donuts, mandazi are often infused with spices and topped with powdered sugar.

Where to try mandazi: Tusks Restaurant and Terrace, Fairmont Mount Kenya Safari Club, Nanyuki, Kenya

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Flickr / 'Bacardi'

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N'dizi No Kastad (Zanzibar)
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N'dizi No Kastad (Zanzibar)
Description

What is n'dizi no kastad? N'dizi no kastad is a banana custard made with vanilla pudding spiced with sugar, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and peanuts that is typically served in a champagne or wine glass.

Where to try n'dizi no kastad: the night market at Forodhani park in Stone Town, Zanzibar

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Hemera / thinkstock

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Hareeseh (Jordan)
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Hareeseh (Jordan)
Description

What is hareeseh? Hareeseh is an Arabic street food that consists of a semolina cake infused with rosewater syrup. The moist cake is sometimes topped with toasted almonds or pistachios.

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Wiki / Aldousari

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Sako (Oman)
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Sako (Oman)
Description

What is sako? Sako is a traditional Omani dessert consisting of a sweet and caramelized tapioca pudding. Ingredients in sako include saffron, sugar, rosewater, ginger, cinnamon, and cardamom. Nuts, such as pistachios or walnuts, may also be chopped into the pudding.

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Sankhya Lapov (Cambodia)
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Sankhya Lapov (Cambodia)
Description

What is sankhva lapov? Sankhva lapov is pumpkin filled with coconut custard that is sometimes served with in an entire hollowed out pumpkin.

Where to try sankhva lapov: Central Market in Siem Reap

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Wiki / Diadoco

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Destaye (Ethiopia)
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Destaye (Ethiopia)
Description

What is destaye? Destaye are dough pastry shells filled with raisins, pistachios, almonds, grated coconut, and cardamom.

Where to try destaye: Ethiopian Diamond Restaurant & Bar in Chicago.

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Flickr / avlxyz

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Luqaimat (United Arab Emirates)
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Luqaimat (United Arab Emirates)
Description

What are luqaimat? Luqaimat are deep-fried pastry balls covered in a date-flavored or sugary syrup and sometimes sprinkled with seeds.

Where to try luqaimat: Sheikh Mohammed Centre for Cultural Understanding, Dubai

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iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Kaab el Ghzal (Morocco)
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Kaab el Ghzal (Morocco)
Description

What is kaab el ghzal? Translated from Arabic which means "gazelle horns," these crescent-shaped cookies are made of almond paste, orange-flower water, cinnamon, and topped with optional powdered sugar.

Where to try kaab el ghzal: Al Jawda Pastry Shop, Marrakech

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Flickr / upload-bot

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Tteok (South Korea)
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Tteok (South Korea)
Description

What is tteok? Tteok are colorful traditional Korean rice cakes made with glutinous rice flour. Tteok can be prepared boiled, steamed, or fried.

Where to try tteok: Tteok Museum in Seoul.

Credit

Wiki / lsageum

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Bariva (New Guinea)
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Bariva (New Guinea)
Description

What is bariva? Bariva is a sweet dessert that combines sago, bananas, and coconut. Ice cream is a preferred accompaniment.

Credit

skerah.com

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Foni Boakiba (Maldives)
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Foni Boakiba (Maldives)
Description

What is foni boakiba? Foni boakiba is coconut rice pudding made of cassava, sugar, grated coconut, and jasmine water.

Where to try foni boakiba: The Hive Restaurant at Beehive Nalahiya Hotel, Maldives

Credit

Flickr / jensteele

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Boortsog (Mongolia)
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Boortsog (Mongolia)
Description

What is boortsog? Boortsog are deep-fried butter cookies that are dipped in honey, tea, butter, or cheese.

Credit

Wiki / Vidor

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Papaya in Caramel Cream Sauce (Seychelles)
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Papaya in Caramel Cream Sauce (Seychelles)
Description

What is papaya in caramel and cream sauce? Fresh papaya slices doused in caramel and cream sauce. This dish can also be replaced with banana.

Where to try papaya in caramel cream sauce: La Diguoise Restaurant in Seychelles

Credit

Hemera / thinkstock

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Cassava Pudding (Fiji)
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Cassava Pudding (Fiji)
Description

What is cassava pudding? Cassava pudding is made from fresh grated cassava, shredded coconut, ginger, and cloves and is often topped with whipped cream.

Where to try cassava pudding: The Fiji Orchard, Fiji

Credit

Flickr / joyosity

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Po'e (Tahiti)
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Po'e (Tahiti)
Description

What is po’e? Po’e is a Tahitian fruit pudding using bananas, brown sugar, vanilla, and coconut cream. Other fruits that can be used in the dish include kiwi, pineapple, papaya, and mangos.

Where to try po’e: Les Roulottes dining carts on the Papeete waterfront in Tahiti.

Credit

iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Turrón (Nicaragua)
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Turrón (Nicaragua)
Description

What is turrón? Turrón are dessert biscuits loaded with nougat, honey, and almonds. Turrón de chocolate is a popular recipe that is covered with a meringue topping.

Where to try turrón: Museo del Turrón , Jijona, Alicante

Credit

Flickr / Lablascovegmenu

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Gajar Ko Halwa (Nepal)
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Gajar Ko Halwa (Nepal)
Description

What is gajar ka halwa? This is a version of carrot pudding that includes carrots, milk, cardamom, raisins, almonds, pistachios, and sugar.

Where to try gajar ka halwa: Himilayan Kitchen , Salt Lake City, Utah

Credit

Flickr / Arnold-Goodway

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Kolak (Indonesia)
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Kolak (Indonesia)
Description

What is kolak? Kolak is a soupy Indonesian dessert made of fruit, sugar, and fresh coconut milk. Fruits typically used in kolak include pumpkin, sweet potato, bananas, jackfruit, and cassava.

Where to try kolak: Kolak can be found in night markets around Bali, such as Sanur and Kreneng.

Credit

Wiki / Nurhafizah

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Banana Shwe Gye Cake (Burma)
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Banana Shwe Gye Cake (Burma)
Description

What is banana shwe gye cake? Banana shwe gye cakes are semolina cakes made with coconut milk, bananas, sugar, and poppy seeds.

Where to try banana shwe gye cake: Green Elephant Restaurant, Yangon, Myanmar

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Flickr / ma_shimaro

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Sikarni (Tibet)
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Sikarni (Tibet)
Description

What is sikarni? Sikarni is a sweet yogurt infused with pistachios and spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, and saffron.

Where to try sikarni: at restaurants near the Jokhang temple in Lhasa

Credit

Flickr / LeeBrimelow

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Bizcocho Criolla (Dominican Republic)
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Bizcocho Criolla (Dominican Republic)
Description

What is bizcocho criolla? Bizcocho criolla is an interpretation of pound cake covered in powdered sugar or meringue. It's a vanilla cake with a coconut cream filling that is the national cake of the Dominican Republic.

Where to try bizcocho criolla: Pastelería del Jardín, Santo Domingo

Credit

iStockphoto / thinkstock

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Pain Patate (Haiti)
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Pain Patate (Haiti)
Description

What is pain patate? Pain patate is a sweet-potato pudding made with white sweet potatoes, raisins, banana, milk, ginger, cinnamon, sugar, coconut, and nutmeg. The dish is often served with ice cream.

Where to try pain patate: Le Lambi, Miami

Credit

Flickr / uits

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Ravjul Moqli (Malta)
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Ravjul Moqli (Malta)
Description

What is ravjul moqli? Ravjul moqli are deep-fried sweet ravioli.

Where to try ravjul moqli: Gululu, Spinola Bay, St. Julians

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Flickr / jeffreyw

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Guava Duff (Bahamas)
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Guava Duff (Bahamas)
Description

What is guava duff? Guava duff is a Bahamian dessert consisting of guava fruit folded within layers of dough. Ingredients for guava duff include guavas, sugar, vanilla, and butter.

Where to try guava duff: The Shoal Restaurant and Lounge, Bahamas

Credit

Flickr / jfhatesmustard

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Dobos Torte (Hungary)
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Dobos Torte (Hungary)
Description

What is dobos torte? Dobos torte is a multi-layer sponge cake flavored with lemon, topped with caramel sauce, and filled with chocolate and buttercream. The dessert's name comes from its creator, Josef Dobos, who invented the dessert in the 1800s in Budapest.

Where to try dobos torte: Gerbeaud, Budapest

Credit

Wiki / Baxter

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Paw Paw Balls (Trinidad and Tobago)
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Paw Paw Balls (Trinidad and Tobago)
Description

What are paw paw balls? Paw paw balls are grated green paw paw (papaya) rolled into balls and coated in a caramelized mixture of lime juice and sugar.

Where to try paw paw balls: market stalls at Store Bay in Tobago.

Credit

Flickr / misocrazy

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Tong But Luk (Hong Kong)
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Tong But Luk (Hong Kong)
Description

What is tong but luck? Tong but luck are sweet and chewy glutinous rice balls. Similar to tangyuan, this dessert can come coated with sesame seeds or nuts.

Where to try tong but luck: Maxim's, Hong Kong

Credit

Flickr / Xiao ka

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Cocadas (Panama)
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Cocadas (Panama)
Description

What are cocadas? Cocadas are sticky and chewy coconut cookies made with vanilla extract, almond extract, shredded coconut, and sweetened milk. The dessert is also popular in other Latin American countries like Brazil, Mexico, and Columbia.

Credit

Wiki / Deparpor

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Toto (Jamaica)
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Toto (Jamaica)
Description

What is toto? Toto is a coconut cake spiced with cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla.

Where to try toto: Devon House Bakery, Kingston

Credit

Wiki / Mangnus Manske

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Kanafeh (Israel)
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Kanafeh (Israel)
Description

What is kanafeh? Israeli kanafeh is a sweet phyllo dough or semolina orange-colored pastry stuffed with goat cheese and drenched in syrup. This Arab dessert has many variations and is popular in many Middle Eastern countries.

Where to try kanafeh? Jafar Sweets in Jerusalem, where kanafeh is made fresh daily.

Credit

Wiki / Guillaume Paumier

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Zhele (Ukraine)
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Zhele (Ukraine)
Description

What is zhele? Zhele is a gelatin Jell-O-like dessert composed of fruit juice and sugar. Fruits used in zhele include cherries and pears, though jellied chocolate and milk are sometimes added too.

Credit

dysmf.blogspot.com

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Kaab el Ghzal (Morocco)
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Kaab el Ghzal (Morocco)
Description

What is kaab el ghzal? Translated from Arabic which means "gazelle horns," these crescent-shaped cookies are made of almond paste, orange-flower water, cinnamon, and topped with optional powdered sugar.

Where to try kaab el ghzal: Al Jawda Pastry Shop, Marrakech

Credit

juusgermankitchen.blogspot.com